Archive for the ‘Gastronomy’ Category

Yellow Pumpkin – Hungarian Creamed Squash with Egg Coated Bread – Tökfőzelék Bundáskenyérrel

The biggest Gourment Festivals in Hungary in 2021 may not be organized because of the Covid-19, but  no worry  won’t miss the more-and-more delicious Hungarian food, because it will continue this year as well, by following rollinginbudapest.com.

It is not possible to talk enough about how much Hungarians like the vegetables served as “heavy soup” anytime of the Season, but if the yellow pumkin is really a summer food.  In the meantime if missing at your veggie market, then the frozen/slice form may be picked  up at the available grocery stores.

Yellow pumpkin (otherwise: Hungarian Creamed Squash) is a low-calorie vegetable, which is an ideal side dish if you wish to lose weight. Yellow pumpkin also serves as a good source of vitamin C and vitamin B.

The Yellow pumpkin (otherwise: Hungarian Creamed Squash) or Tökfőzelék in Hungarian is one of the most popular and healthy dishes of Hungary.  It is cooked throughout anytime of the week  and is loved by all generations.

May Serve it with Hungarian meatballs or 2 tablespoons of Hungarian Goulash (Pörkölt) or fried eggs. Many families love to have with Bundáskenyér – Egg coated bread. The egg coated bread can be also a light, yet filling yummy breakfast or as a savoury snack alone. 

The classic dill pumpkin vegetable can be made in several ways, with sour cream or cream. This is an excellent creamy-dill pumpkin recipe!

Serving for 3 person – Ingredients:  Take 1 kg of yellow pumpkin (mirelite or fresh planed), 3 tsps of cooking oil, 1 large head onion,  1 tsp  of red peper powder, 600 ml of basic juice – bone or  1 teaspoon of vinegar (10%),  dill (fresh), salt,  black pepper (ground ).

For frothing: 1 heaped teaspoon of wheat flour, 100 ml of cooking cream (15-20%) … The cream gives a pleasant full taste and texture.

Cooking: The onion is cleaned and finely chopped. We fry the onion in the cooking oil for a few minutes at a medium temperature, but do not fry it! and remove from the heat and add 1 teaspoon of red pepper, then add the thawed, drained planed pumpkin to the withered onion. pour in the stock, add the vinegar. Chop the dill and add to the pumpkin. Simmer the pumpkin under cover for about 10-15 minutes. We make a mortar. Add the cream to the flour slowly, stirring constantly. Stir until the froth is completely smooth. The froth is added to the pumpkin with constant, rapid stirring and then concentrated to a vegetable consistency. Finally, season with salt, sugar, pepper and vinegar to taste. Serve garnished with dill. It is very tasty both served hot and/or cold.

Ingredients:  Egg coated bread calculation with 1 slice of bread (per person), 1 piece of egg (per person), salt to taste (but not necessarily necessary), 3 tbsp sunflower oil.

Preparation: Beat the eggs in a deep plate and beat with a fork. The bread slices are cut in half and rolled into the eggs one by one. We can also let it suck in a little with the eggs. Place a little oil in a pan and when it is hot, put the slices of bread in it and fry both sides until golden brown.

© Aggie Reiter

The Real Hungarian Apple Strudel – Az Igazi Magyar Almás Rétes

The Apple Strudel became popular in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire.

The strudel is often associated with the Austrian cuisine, and also known as a traditional pastry around the whole area of the former Austro-Hungarian empire. Therefore, for many it may sound as a reminder of the Austrian Strudel, which is made of plate feuilletée, but the Hungarian made strudel is more kinda filo dough. The filo dough is similar to middle Eastern or Turkish filo. The traditional Strudel pastry dough is very elastic. It is made from flour with a high gluten content so pardon … to the folks for thier sensivity to gluten)… egg, water and lard. No sugar is added. The dough need to be worked hard and vigorously rested, and then rolled out and stretched by hand very thinly with the help of a clean linen kitchen towel.

By-the-way, the best known strudels are apple strudel, sweet soft quark cheese strudel, followed by sour cherry or sweet cherry strudel or so much loved by Hungarians the poppy seed strudel. The sweet strudels are often served along with cream. Many folks like the savoury strudels and there are some of them: sauerkraut, pumkin, cabbage … soforth … fancy fantasy up to imagination.

Receipt: for 3 rolls (wish more than 3 rolls  lets say 6 rolls then duplicate the amount of ingredients)

Preparing Time: 45-60 mins.

Ingredients: 1 big pack of filo dough cca. 400gr, 1 kg apples, 1/2 tbs ground cinnamon, 150 gr sugar (depending how sweet to taste), 2 tbs breadcrumbs.

Preparation: Peel and core apples then grate them into a big bowl. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, mix well. Lightly dampen a clean dish towel and spread out over a smooth work surface. Press to extract any excess juice. Spread the dough layers on the top of each other over the dish towel and brush with oil.Scetter breadcrumbs lightly onto the last pastry. Sprinkle with walnut. Place the apple filling on the side. Roll up the pastry tightly with the help of the kitchen towel. Brush its top and sides with more oil, so to be crunchy. Bake it in pre-heated oven to 180 C degree for about 15-20 mins.

Don’t Worry … Be Happy … cause it might not have the look as expected of your baking for the first time but it probably taste excellent and keep in mind that you can be an expert  by gaining a little practise.

©  Aggie Reiter

Floating Island – Madár Tej – Hungarian Deliciousness Creamy Dessert

This is another famous and classic easy recipe among Hungarian families.  

The Hungarian “Bird’s milk” – “Madártej” is a vanilla custard containing foam dumplings whipped from egg whites, and originates from France. In 1834 this sweet dessert made from milk and eggs made its way to Hungary as deeply loved delight for sweet tooth individuals.

Bird milk is an imaginary name, more than probably a wandering term that originally referred to an imaginary food (its history dates back to antiquity).

The word bird milk has appeared with different names in many European languages since the middle of the 18th century. The Hungarian name as Bird’s milk – Madártej is known in the world having named differently …

The dessert made its success all through the Continent. It can be found in almost all the countries in Europe and even in India … e.g. “Oeufs á la neige” – (eggs on the snow) or “Ile flottante” – are often available in French bistros. The floating islands are known by the English speakers and also for Spaniards. In addition to us, the Romanians also follow the bird’s milk line. The Austrians go on calling it canary milk “Kanarimilch”. In India, “Rasmala” is made without eggs and cardamom, which is also flavored with pistachios and saffron.

Receipt – Ingredients – for 4 person – peparating time: 20 mins.


For the basic cream … 6 eggs separated, pinch of salt, 150 g sugar, 1 liter milk, 12 g vanilia sugar (1 packet), 3 tbs flour, 10 dkg raisins Instead of the 1 packet of vanilla sugar or a little aroma, if possable choose 1 real vanilla stick, it’s worth it, it gives the bird’s milk a yummy taste.

Step-by-step Cooking … Meringues beat egg whites with a pinch of salt until soft peaks form. Add 3 tbs of sugar and beat until stiff. Bring half of the milk and scraped seeds of vanilla stick to boil in a large pot, then reduce to a simmer. Scoop up egg-sized peices of beaten egg white mixture and gently slide into the simmering milk. When the meringues rise, carefully turn them and cook on the other side. (about 1 min. egy side) Set then after aside.

For the vanilla sauce … add the rest of the milk into the pot and let it start to simmer again. Mix the yorks with the remaining sugar and flour. Add the vanillia suger to the simmering milk. Remove from the heat, pour slowly – ladia-by-ladie – into the york mixture, whisting constannly. Then pour the mixture in the warm milk. Add thróe raisin Place the pot back on to the heat and cook over low heat until the sauce sóbegins to ticken.

To assemble and serve, spoon meringues into a glass bowl. Pour the vanilla souce on top sprinkle with raisins. Best is when cold, so store in the fridge for a while before serving, but maybe in between someone has discovered it and many are missing. Then off you go it only take 20 mins to get this yummy dessert ready again.

© Aggie Reiter

Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli

According to some sources, bejgli is originally from Silesia, a type of cake known in Europe since the 14th century. Others write about Armenian origins, and as is customary, the exact history of origins is obscured by the past. What is certain: bejgli was originally made in the form of a horseshoe, from which its German name is derived, and then it was introduced into the Hungarian language through Austrian mediation in the second half of the 19th century.

According to the old folks saying … if the walnut bejgli gets on the table at Xmas, it protect from spoilage. And also a poppy sead bejgli, then inhabitants of the house be in great abundance and happiness next year. And last but not least … the new year will soon bring a husband to the young girl/s

Surely there are gourmets who improve on the traditions with the Xmas chestnut bejgli with other various fillings.

During the high holiday season in December the scent of the baking  begli in your home is a dream itself.The Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli stands  # 1 for me next to the chestnut, walnut and poppy seed  bejgli.

Now let’s go the the next level … Receipt – Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli

Ingredients for 2 roll bejgli: 30 dkg flour, 7.5 dkg butter, 5 dkg of fat, 4 dkg powdered sugar, 1 dkg of yeast, 1 egg yolk, small pinch of salt, 1 dl milk. (+1 egg for greasing the top).

For the marzipan filling: 25 dkg prunes, 15 dkg of marzipan paste, 10 dkg candied minced almonds, 1 dl plum pálinka (but not nessesary, but it brings an extra taste.

Meanwhile prepare the marzipan filling: Cut the marzipan into small cubes and heat it with the sugar, add the prunes soaked in pálinka, and finally add plum jam.

Preparation step-by-step … making bejgli cake:
Sift the flour and then crumble the yeast. Add several ingredients of the dough to the flour and knead the elastic dough from the whole with a machine or quick movements. Divide the kneaded dough into two equal pieces and then form into two loaves from the dough and cover with a kitchen towel a place it at cool place for at least 1 hour. Thenafter, stretch the dough (without undercutting) into a rectangle. When making bejgli,  make sure that the filling and dough are the same amount.Spread the cooled filling on the dough, leaving a 1 cm section on each side. Fold the edges of the dough inwards and then roll up the bejgli evenly. Be sure to make the same amount of filling and dough when making bejgli.

Stir in the egg yolk and thinly with it the bejgli. Place the smeared bejgli in a dry, cold place until the egg layer is dry.

Prick the side of the bejgli (this is needed so that the steam can come out and not crack) and the top. Bake the bejgli in a preheated 180 °C oven.

© Aggie Reiter

One of the Hungarians Most Classic Cake for Xmas – Sugar-free Snowball Cake

As getting closer to the Season Holidays, many are wondering what kinda cake to come up with which is baked so quickly, easy to bake and being heavenly in taste. Naturally, there are many quicky and tasty Hungarian’s love to taste, so tune in or should I say roll over to this site but the meantime give this one a try.

Ingredients:cake pan shape size 26 cm will do just fine.
For the cocoa sponge cake: 8 eggs, 2 tbsp erythritol, 2 tbsp cocoa powder, 1 packet baking powder, 1 pinch of salt, 10 dkg flour, 15 dkg wholemeal flour, 1 dl water
Liquid sweetener equivalent to 20 dkg of sugar
For the cream: 10 dkg flour or 1 packet of coconut pudding powder, 5 dl milk, 4 tbsp coconut shavings, 10 dkg erythritol or liquid sweetener, 20 dkg butter, 5 tbsp erythritol
Covering the outside: about 10 dkg of coconut shavings
On the topping: 1 bar of sugar-free chocolate, 2 teaspoons of oil.

Baking instructions:
For the sponge cake, separate the eggs and beat the protein to a foam with the erythritol. Cocoa powder, baking powder, salt and flour are mixed. Stir in the egg yolks in the protein mousse, in small portions, then add the water and flour alternately to the dough gently to keep the dough frothy and gently stir in the sweetener. Bake in a buttered, floured cake tin at 180 degrees for about 20 minutes. When cooled, cut into three parts.

For the cream: Mix the custard powder (flour) with a little milk. Bring the remaining milk to a boil point, then pour in the custard powder and cook until thickened, stir in the coconut, sweetener and allow to cool. Stir the butter into the foam with the erythritol and then work together with the cooled coconut cream. When assembling the cake, smear the sponge cakes with the cream and then layer the sheets on top of each other … the top sheet should be the smoothest sponge cake … spread the top only thinly with cream, but spread around the side thicker, thereafter also sprinkle with coconut shavings … may garnished also be to covered with chocolate chips. Melt the chocolate with oil on top of the cake over water vapor and spread on top of the cake. Place in the fridge until it gets slightly frosty.

It’s soft, creamy, coconut and even chocolatey, so it’s basically incapable and very delicious.  It looks so good that it fits anytime and very well on the Xmas table too!

© Aggie Reiter

“Hanukkah” in the Air Tonight – “Festival of Light” – Tradition – Story – Food @ 2020

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday, often referred to as the “Festival of Lights.”

Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days and nights.

The Hebrew calendar determines when Hanukkah begins and ends each year, which is based on the lunar cycle and the seasons. It was created in ancient times based on observations of the appearance of the crescent moon. This means that the dates of holidays vary from year to year based not on the Gregorian calendar but on the phases of the moon (which last 29.5 days). Some years are longer or shorter than others, but instead of adding a leap day every four years, the Hebrew calendar adds a full lunar month to seven out of every 19 years. The Chinese calendar is also calculated based on a combination of the movement of the moon and the sun. Following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar.

In 2020 Hanukkah runs from the evening of December, 10 to the last candle lighting evening of Dec. 18.

Not at all Jewish Xmas, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in the second century B.C. The Hanukkah story is based on historical events that took place in 165 BCE in Jerusalem. After the Second Temple in Jerusalem was desecrated by the Seleucid Emperor Antiochus IV and his Greco-Syrian troops, Jewish priest Mattathias and his sons rebelled. Retaking Jerusalem and the Temple, they lit the holy lamp (the menorah) but had only enough oil for one night. Miraculously, the lamp stayed lit for eight days until enough holy oil could be procured.

Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday and it became a more significant holiday in the western world because of its proximity to Xmas and the desire among more secular Jews to participate in the cultural build-up to the winter solstice. Also as a result, gift-giving became more popular in the west than in other parts of the world. While the traditions of Hanukkah are similar around the world, each country has its own unique twist.

Hanukkah means “Dedication” and also called Feast of Dedication, Festival of Lights, aka Feast of the Maccabees, or Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days. Hanukkah reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting of candles as the sun goes down on each day of the festival.

All over the world, candlelight celebrations are celebrated in some form. Let’s visit some parts of the World, what and how they are celebrating …

In parts of France, for example, families light a double-decker (16-candle) menorah, while in Morocco fried treats are made with fruit juice and orange zest.

Butter sculpture – Buddhist New Year’s custom. It is also a Tibetan custom for Buddhist monks to carve meticulously made statues of yak butter at New Year’s Eve, bringing to life a different story and teaching tale each year. The statues sometimes reach a height of 10 meters and are illuminated by special butter lamps. The most successful sculptures will receive an award.

Solstice in Scotland: The Feast of Solstice is held on the eve of the shortest day of the year. In the first millennium of our time, the ancestors of the Scots today, the Druids, celebrated the God of the Sun at solstice, rejoicing that it would then return and become stronger again. The customs still live today in Vikkan traditions, in English-speaking areas, and in various variations in other parts of the world. A large block of wood — the Column of Julias — is set up in the middle of a clearing and set on fire. Everyone then dances around the fire. It is said that the more noise they make, the better, because it awakens the god of the sun and thus the process of revival.

Night of Hikes – Mexico:  An unusual ceremony takes place in Oaxaca, Mexico on December 23 each year. It began in the middle of the last century when the Spaniards brought the first radish to Mexico. In Oaxaca, they grow very large, but due to the stony soil, they turn into all sorts of strange, twisted shapes. Local folk artists then carve all sorts of interesting things out of these, scenes from the Bible, and local Aztec legends. Cash prizes will be won by the best sculptors and the evening will end with a dazzling fireworks display.

Befana – Italy: “Bifana” – a friendly witch, flies down the chimneys on a broom to place presents in the hanged stockings. Legend has it that Bifana was just sweeping when the Three Kings knocked on him. They offered to take it with them, but he said he didn’t have time. He changed his mind later, but it was too late. That’s why he still goes into every house at Christmas and leaves gifts everywhere.

China New Year: It begins on the first day of the New Moon and ends fifteen days later, at full moon. The fifteenth day is called the Lampion Festival, the celebration begins after sunset when lanterns are lit all over and people march through the streets with lanterns hanging on their sticks in their hands.

The Chinese calendar is calculated following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar. It is about 29.5 days long. To correct the shift, the Chinese occasionally insert an extra year into the calendar, a total of seven times during a 19-year cycle. This is the same as the way we do an extra day  a.k.a. leap year every four years at the end of February. However, this is the reason why according to the day-based calendar, Chinese New Year always falls on a different date.

Dozmocse – Celebration of the Dying Year in Tibet: The center of the five-day celebration is a column adorned with stars and other decorations made of colored yarn. Dancers wearing scary masks bounce around to scare away bad spirits for years to come. The next few days will be filled with daring and prayers, and as a finale, the people will knock down the pillar together and take apart the decorations.

One of the cakes connected to Hanukkah is the Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnuts. These delicious dessert treats are made with yeast and must be allowed to rise. They’re often topped with confectioners sugar and/or in-and-out-side with home-made apricot jam. Yeast is allowed in foods year-round except during the Passover holiday when Jews eat unleavened bread in commemoration of their flight from Egypt (as described in the Old Testament).

Receipt … Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnut

Overall time from preparation to consumption: 1 hour 45 minutes

Ingredients for 20 piece of donuts: 2.5 dl milk, 30 g yeast, 1 month + 50 g powdered sugar, 500 g fine flour, salt, 6 egg yolks, 60 g soft butter / margarine, frying oil
vanilla powdered sugar for sprinkling

Preparation: Lighten the milk, mix in 1 dl of yeast and 1 tbs. icing sugar. Sift the flour into a bowl, make a recess in the middle, pour in the yeast milk, mix a little flour from the edges, then cover with a kitchen towel and let it double, i.e. make sourdough (15 minutes). In the remaining 1.5 dl of lukewarm milk, mix the remaining 50 g of icing sugar, 1 pinch of salt and egg yolks, then add to the flour and work together with a wooden spoon. Knead the butter / margarine in 2-3 portions, cover and double-boil in a warm place (30 minutes). Knead the dough on a floured worktop, flatten and flatten with a floury palm, and puncture with a 6-8 cm diameter cake tongue (or glass) dipped in flour (knead the falling parts without flour, re-tear). The discs are stacked at a distance of 5 cm on a floured tray or board, the tops are lightly smeared with oil (so as not to crust), then covered loosely first with folpack and then with a kitchen towel and doubled again. Pour 2-3 fingers of oil into a medium-sized pan (25-28 cm in diameter) and heat it – it should not be smoky-hot, because the outside of the donut will blush too soon, but it is feared that the middle will remain semi-raw! Press the center of the dough discs with your thumb and place them in the oil with the half that was on top (about 4-5 pieces because they will grow during baking). Cover the legs (this will make them “ribbon”), bake the donuts on a moderate heat for 4-5 minutes, then turn them over with a sieve spoon and bake them until golden brown without a lid. Soak up the excess oil on a paper towel, arrange on a preheated bowl, sprinkle with vanilla powdered sugar and serve freshly hot. Home-made apricot jam in-and-outside of the donutsnare just heavenly. Also may have them aside and in a separate bowl.

© Aggie Reiter

Just in Time … Traditional Hungarian Scone with Pork or Goose Cracklings  – Sertés vagy Liba Tepertős Pogácsa

The cake is one of the oldest and most popular baked goods in the Hungarian-inhabited areas, but also in many other nations. The origin of the name is derived from the Latin word focus – fire. Although at first its sound not similar to that used in Hungaria, but when we think of the fried dough of Italian bakeries – the Latin focacea – it sounds more familiar. To this day, Italians call focaccia the flatter, smaller variety of bread. The Hungarian language took the name South Slavic pogača (which originally meant pie). In most European countries, “cake” baking sounds familiar. “Pogatschen” for the Germans, “poğaça” for the Turks,”hogaza” for the Spanish, and “fougasse” for the French.

From time travel, let’s just jump back to the present … Hungarians make typical cakes for the coming Xmas feasts, but the Pogács – Scone is popular to bake anytime throughout the 365 days of the year.  It is also a national yummy with wide spread of stuffings. There are so many varieties of  fillings of the “Pogácsa” – “Scone” with different flavors such as: cheese, potato, goose cracklings, sour cream, cottage cheese, sheep’s cheese, crumbly, cabbage, butter, different seeds, onion, green spice, and of course there can be different variations of them, regardless of the variety. In addition to the traditional flavors, may  find at different regions different fillings …  broccoli, chili, wild onion (especially in the town Orfű), bean (City of Sopron).

After a hearty heavy soup …  let’s say the “goulash soup” Scone with Pork or Goose chopped cracklings Tepertős Pogácsa is really heavenly!

Here is a reminder to the Gyulás heavy soup receipt: https://rollinginbudapest.com/2020/05/06/a-1000-year-history-cuisine-of-hungary/ along another receipt of beloved chesse scone – sajtós pogácsa.

Receipt to the Traditional Hungarian Scone Pork or Goose cracklings  –  Sertés vagy Liba Tepertős pogácsa

Preparation time cca. 2 hours. Cooking time ½ an hour up 1 hour.

Ingredients: 60ml /4 tbsp milk, 1 tsp dried yeast, 250g pork or goose chopped cracklings, 500g plain flour – plus extra for dusting, 1 tsp baking powder, ½ tsp salt, 2 tbsp grated parmesan or as taste, 1 tbsp caraway seeds, 120g unsalted butter, 120 ml soured cream,  2 eggs beaten, to cover the scone with beaten egg and a drop of water, to glaze.

Preparation: Gently heat the milk in a pan until it is lukewarm, then pour it into a jug and stir in the yeast. Leave it for 15 mins or so to get working and froth up. Meanwhile, heat a heavy-based pan with the already fried craklings a bits until crisp and golden. Remove them from the pan and leave to cool. Sift the flour into a bowl and mix with the baking powder and salt. Stir in the parmesan or other cheese and caraway seeds. Put the butter in a small pan over a gentle heat and allow it to melt until it is just liquid. Take the pan off the heat, stir in the soured cream and add the beaten eggs – make sure the butter isn’t too hot or the eggs will scramble. Add the cooled crispy cracklings and stir in the yeasty milk. Pour the buttery egg and chopped mixture into a large bowl, then add the flour and other dry ingredients, for a short time, until everything is combined. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and knead for 5 mins or so until elastic. You can do this with a mixer and a dough hook as you like. Put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with oiled cling film and leave it in a draught-free place for about an 1½ hours until it has doubled in size.

Baking: Turn the dough out again and knock it back with your knuckles. Dust the dough with flour and roll it out to about 4 cm in thick  length.

Preheat the oven to 200 C / 400 F. Place on the a baking tray a baking sheet. Then place and leave  the pogácsa  scone to rest for another 10 mins before putting into the oven.  Brush the scone with the beaten egg and water to glaze and bake them for 25–30 mins until top just begins to turn golden.

© Aggie Reiter

Hungarian Home Made Appetizer – Ham Cream – Pâté – Sonkakrém Pástétom

A great appetizer, may serve with thinly sliced brown bread, crackers or chips.

Served for 4 persons- Preparing time 15 mins.

Ingredients: 25 dkg cubbed smoke ham or Prague-style (if available), 10 dkg butter, 6 tsps sour cream, 2 tsps finely chopped onion, 2 tsps mustard, a drop of tomatoe pasta on top,salt, pepper.

Preparation: Fry the onions in oil, remove from the heat, sprinkle with paprika, dissolve in a little water and fry back on its fat. Stir in the ham into strips and chop it together with the butter in a shredder and melt with a little water and simmer (about 20-30 minutes). Then add the sour cream, mustard, a pinch of salt and pepper and let rest to cool down in the fridge for one hour. Very delicious breakfast to start off the day with a toast or two, hard boiled eggs and fresh vegetables. Indeed may enjoy this home-made appetizer anytime of the day … can spread it on sandwiches, snack or enjoy the smooth taste even as an afternoon dip. For dieters, recommending with a slice of wholemeal toast with this yummy Hungarian pâté. 

© Aggie Reiter

Hungarian Home Made Appetizer – Veal Liver Pâté – Borjúmájas Krém with Fennel Salad

Preparation time: 10 mins. –  Cooking time: 25 mins. – Additional: 1h 10 mins.  Total: 1 H 45 mins.  Served for 4 people.

Ingredients: 40 dkg goose veal liver, 10 dkg salted butter, 2 dl dry red wine, 1 strand rosemary, 1 head onion, 3 dl cooking oil, 3 dl vegetable stock, 1 fennel, 5 dkg baby spinach, 5 dkg fries salad, 1 lime lemon, 1 dl extra virgin olive oil, 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar, salt, freshly ground black pepper.

Fry the peeled garlic and onion in the heated fat, add the liver cut into thin strips and the rosemary. After the liver has released its juice, add the red wine, salt and pepper. Replace the boiled juice with vegetable juice.

After about half-an-hour of cooking, filter if necessary, blend with cold, chopped salted butter to a creamy finish, then shape and freeze overnight in the refrigerator. Cut thin slices of fennel, fry some of them in golden oil at 170 C° until golden brown, which will add a little crispiness to the salad.

Place the other half in a mixing bowl, add the already washed baby leaves, the torn fries, grated citrus peels, vinegar and olive oil, then mix and serve. The liver is sliced ​​as desired with a knife soaked in hot water.

Can be served with thinly sliced brown bread, rye crisp or crackers. … Mouthwateruing and very delicious.

© Aggie Reiter

5th Italian World Gastronomic Week @ Budapest – Hungary – 2020

This year will be online programs during the Vth Italian World Gastronomy Week featuring four through November 23 – 29. 2020.

Along the week, two remote cinema screenings, a webinar and an online cooking course await for those interested.

Map of Art of Eating Well – Regions of Italy

Showing the famous foods of its originate.

In the framework of the 5th World Italian Gastronomic Week and on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Pellegrino Artusi the Italian Cultural Institute coordially calls audience online to the Pellegrino Artusi, the first gastroblogger event held by Prof. Massimo Montanari – Professor, Department of Cultural and Social History, University of Bologna @ 6 p.m. on November 24, 2020 to the Zoom platform. The webinar is designed to showcase the famous gastronomist and writer whose book The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating which was published in 1897 after twenty years of research and in fifteen different editions published with the collaboration of readers who took an active part in sending their recipes and implementation. This is why Artusi’s handbook contributes in building a national culture of Italian unity that was not realized much earlier. The audience can listen to his presentation with simultaneous interpretation in Hungarian language.

On November 23, the film Spiced to Taste will be screened on the online cooking course, Domenico Cilenti remote Cinema platform from 7.30 p.m. Experience changes Arturo’s attitude to life forever.

On November 26, joining the program the Italian Cultural Institute in Prague, also with Prof. Massimo Montanari, Professor of the Department of Cultural and Social History at the University of Bologna, Pellegrino Artusi, through the webinar designed to showcase the famous gastronomist and writer whose book The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating was published in 1897 and has since been published in fifteen different editions (lecture: 6 p.m.- Zoom platform).

On November 27, the Gastro Week program continues with an online cooking course, Domenico Cilenti introduces its viewers to the secrets of Puglia cuisine (7 p.m. – on the Zoom platform).

The Gastro Week ends with the screening of Gianni Di Gregorio’s Golden Lady of the Old Women (Pranzo di Ferragosto)nominated for the Golden Lion on 30 November. The hero of the film is a Roman man in his sixties who spends his daily life caring for his mother. Due to her financial problems, in mid-August, as the Ferragosto holiday approaches, she takes care of another lady and then doesn’t even notice, and her apartment will be full of unknown aunts she needs to take care of in a matter of seconds. (7.30 p.m. – Remote Cinema).

Members of the Italian Cultural Institute with a valid membership card (+1 person) can participate at the film screenings and webinars, participation is free and registration is required. Mandatory reservation until November 23, 2020 10 p.m. – through iicbudapest@esteri.it

Streaming codes in limited numbers, in order of application.

© Aggie Reiter