Archive for the ‘Hungarian cuisine historical retrospection’ Category

“Q” & “A” … Inherited Croatian food in Hungary

Popular Croatian Dishes that made home in the Hungarian kitchen

Ajngemahtec – Croatian Chicken Soup with Wheat Grits Dumplings

„Q” Where does the name „Ajngemahtec origin?

„A” The name comes from the German word eingemacht, which could be roughly translated as all in one, due to the fact this simple one-pot dish

„Q” Where did Ajngemahtec – Croatian chicken soup come from??

„A” The cuisine was strongly influenced by Croatia from the Austrian neighbors

Indeed it is nourishing soup with different veggies, containing chicken, heart dumplings and delicious with hearty dumplings. The soup usually served before Sunday lunch not only in Croatia, but Hungary as well as the home remedy to cure everything from flu to hangovers. In Croatia and Hungary it is common in adding to the chicken soup the VEGETA seasoning fulfills an extra flavor of veggies (but be careful with the salting later) Once you tried the mouthwatering soup you will love it. It is pretty simple to prepare it. Nice and comforting chicken soup, traditional (Sunday meal) both in Croatia and also delicious on the table in Hungary

Cooking time: 1h – Servings 4 – Ingredients: 4-6 pieces of chicken thighs bone in, 1 medium onion, 2 large carrots – 1 shredded and 1 finely sliced, 1 cup frozen peas, 1 small parley root (finely sliced), 1 chicken bullion cube, 6 cups of hot water, 2 tsp oil, 2 tsp chopped parsley leaves, 1 tsp VEGETA seasoning optional or any available veggie flavoring, salt and pepper

Dumplings: 2 medium eggs, 2 tsp oil vegetable or sunflower, about 2/3 cup semolina add more, for firmer dumplings.

Cooking instructions: In a large pot heat oil under medium heat, add chopped onion and cook about 2 minutes. Add shredded and sliced carrots and sliced parsley root, season with a pinch of salt and cook for 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Add chicken thighs, 1 -2 cups of water, bullion cube and cook on low heat for 25 mins, stirring occasionally and adding water if necessary. After 25 mins add frozen peas, pour remaining water and cook for 10-15 mins. Remove chicken from the soup and shred the meat of the bone. Put aside.

In a mean time in separate bowl beat eggs with 2 tsp of oil, slowly add semolina, stirring constantly until you get thick batter, making sure that no lumps remain. Warm tablespoon under hot water and with a tablespoon drop full spoons of batter into the soup and cook for additional 10 mins. Add the chicken back to the pot, add chopped parsley leaves, season with salt, pepper and 1 tsp VEGETA and cook for 1-2 mins. Serve warm.

Ćevapi sausages

(In Hungary named: Csevap or Csevapcsicsa)

„Q” What are Ćevapi sausages?

„A” Bascially the Ćevapi are grilled, skinless finger-shaped sausages.

„Q” Where does the Ćevapi origin?

„A” The Ćevapi itself has a Turkish origin. Turkish influence in the similarity to the Turkish kofta kebab, which is a mixed-meat sausage that is molded onto skewers for easy grilling.

The recipe itself will not be complicated at all, in fact, it is extremely simple easy to make, the only possibility of mistakes is found only in the quality of the ingredients. That’s why it’s important to pick meats minced beef or pork, and spices. Ćevapi together with chopped onions, kajkmak, sour cream, minced red pepper, ajvar, and salt are incredibly tasty. For best flavor, let the sausages marinade in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour, up to an overnight.

Ćevapi has an incredibly unique taste and beside among Croatians at the Hungarian kitchen indeed appreciated. Delicious smoky flavor and are perfect for serving with flatbread and sliced onions.

Preperation time 20 mins, Cooking time: 10 mins.

Ingredients: 0.55 lb minced beef, 0.55 lb minced pork, 3 garlic cloves minced,1 ¼ tsp salt, 1 tsp ground black pepper,1 tsp paprika, ¾ tsp baking soda.

Cooking instructions: Take a large bowl mix together all ingredients.Using slightly over 1 tsp of meat mixture per sausage, shape the mixture into sausages the size and shape of a fat finger (roughly 3 inches long and ¾ of an inch in diameter).Place all the formed sausages in a single layer on a platter. Cover the platter and refrigerate for at least 1 hour (up to overnight). When you are ready to cook your sausages, preheat your grill to medium heat, 180⁰C -200⁰C (350-400⁰F) (You should be able to hold your hand a few inches from the cooking grate for 5-7 seconds.). To grill the sausages using a fine grate grill pan for 4-5 mins a side, until golden and springy. Serve the Ćevapi with sliced sweet onions and flatbread (like lepinja or pita). Mind you on the otherside of the Moon, @ Woolworths, Beef Chevaps are prepared ready just to roast Downunder.

Štrukli from Croatia to Hungary

„Q” Where origin of Štrukli?

„A” The exact origin of štrukli remains unknown, but traced a staple for … pastry and a salty stuffing made from cow cottage cheese, cream and eggs long ago on the hills and forests, northern Croatia … some say the original dish also called Zagorje strukli, originates from the Zagorje region of Croatia)

„Q” What is the Štrukli?

„A” It is a rather simple „pulled pasta” dish, which, depending on the type of filling, can be either savory or sweet.

There are 2 types of Štrukli: boiled and baked. Ingredient is most important need the fresh cottage cheese …  it has a fresh, slightly acidic taste and a refined taste of milk that is only really began to ferment.

Dough ingredients: 0.90 lb, 1 egg, 1 tsp oil, salt.

Serve: 8 – Ingredients for the filling: 20 oz (600 g) fresh cottage cheese, 3.3 oz (100 g) butter, softened + 2 tsp,4 eggs, 0.4 cups (100 ml) sour cream

Preparation time: 30 minsMeanwhile preheat then oven if baked to 180⁰C (365⁰F).

Mix a firm dough of flour, 1 egg, oil and a little salt water. Stir until bubbles appear, then shape the dough into 2 loave ball and roll it  using the tablecloth , stretch the dough out a bit and coat it with oil so that it doesn’t dry out and cover with a warm towel. Leave the dough to rest for 1h. The dough is then stretched out, as usual, on a sheet smeared with oil or on a cloth sprinkled with flour. Mix the ingredients of the filling well, then place small piles on the dough with a spoon in a row, not too far apart. The dough is rolled up, the dough is squeezed between the piles with a wooden spoon and then separated using a plate. This is how to get the separate pieces filled with cottage cheese, which is cooked in flag salt water. Don’t have to cook for long when it comes to the top of the water, good. Place the cooked Štruklies next to each other in a fireproof bowl or baking tray, pour over the cream to cover them.

Stuffing mixture: mix the cow cheese with 4 eggs, melted butter and a little salt and mix until smooth.

Cooking time: 50 mins.  Knead a medium-soft strudel dough from the dough.Divide into 2 loaves, smear with oil, rest for 1h in a warm place. The dough is then stretched out, as usual, on a sheet smeared with oil or on a cloth sprinkled with flour. Mix the ingredients of the filling well, then place small piles on the dough with a spoon in a row, not too far apart. The dough is rolled up, the dough is squeezed between the piles with a wooden spoon and then separated using a plate. This is how we get the separate pieces filled with cottage cheese, which we cook in flag salt water. You don’t have to cook for long when it comes to the top of the water, good. Bake in the oven for about 50 mins at 180⁰C (365⁰F) until golden brown.

Excellent both either hot or cold. You can also put a little filling on the cooked Štrukli.

© Aggie Reiter

Under the 150 years of Turkish rule had the greatest influence on Hungarian gastronomy.

During the Turkish occupation, countless, previously unknown flavors entered Hungarian cuisine.

If we approach from the side of gastronomy in the 16-17. century history, meet positive effects with countless, previously unknown flavors and its development of today’s culinary culture.

Hungarian eating habits during the Turkish occupation were characterized by the fact that the dishes were prepared with butter, many dairy products were in use and the dishes were very seasoned. Cooked pasta and dumplings were added as a side dish or used in soup. Among the dishes were pies, sausages, sausages, jellies, donuts, pancakes, and strudel. The cooking methods included grating, pickling, stitching, draping, ablation, steaming, toasting. In the Turkish occupation areas naturally the Turkish culinary culture came to the fore, using the characteristics of Turkish cuisine. We took the patties, flame, bejglit and stuffed cabbage from the Turks. Parsley, cumin, anise and horseradish are among our herbs inherited in our kitchen. Among the sweets, they brought barbecue, cakes, sponge cakes, bird milk, gingerbread, Turkish honey and its typical coffee. Then poppy, tomato and eggplant appeared. Turkish influences began to grow almonds, cherries, figs, nuts, grapes, peaches and cherries in Hungary. Pepper has become an indispensable element in Hungarian gastronomy through Turkish mediation. It has enriched our nutritional culture, has resulted in many common meals, and as a result, the Turkish-Hungarian tastes are quite close to each other. All-in -all, we can say that in the Hungarian nutrition culture by the Turkish influence has brought about significant changes that are still effective.

Regarding the consumption of meat, the pork has become increasingly popular in Hungary in the 16th century, as pork was not consumed by Turkish soldiers, so it could remain intact even during looting.

Meaty and rice dishes: Basically the shepherd’s dish into the Hungarian cuisine came from the Turks. These foods are mainly porridge and pasta dishes, lentils, sturgeon, egg barley. The pilau – rice and meat, biber – stuffed peppers, stuffed cabbage became our favorite food during the occupation and still today in the XXI century. Both peoples are well-known for their meaty buns, the only difference is that Hungarian cuisine pork was in use as the filling. Among the most well-known dishes of Turkish cuisine are the dishes stuffed with cabbage or rice in vine leaves which are available in tins at the local stores.

Sweets: From Turkish times, our cuisine becomes “sweeter” and finds its place in Hungarian cuisine with brittle cake, brioche, bird milk, honey brioche, turkey honey or quince cheese. Also arriving in the Turkish mediation the poppy seeds which later became in the Hungarian pasta and cakes, cakes.

Regarding to the Hungarian pastries, the „pogácsa” pastry (based on rather salty soft snack) and since the word itself is of Ottoman origin (called then Baghja), we have reason to believe that it was already known to the conquering Hungarians, only amplified by the Ottoman-Turkish era. Turkish honey was originally an Armenian sweet, but it came to us through the mediation of the Turks.

Turkish herbs and vegtables: Also played a significant role in Hungarian gastronomy. At that time it became an indispensable spice for peasant cuisine, but now-a-days these spices make our food even more colorful. Eggplants have been native in-and-around the Mediterranean and the Balkans since the 17th century, but to Hungary came through the Turkish mediation, which is a.k.a.  Turkish paradise.  One of the best known dishes made of it was the stuffed eggplant called “töltött padlizsán” “imam bayıldı” – “imam fainted”. Cannot skip to mention the seasoning with Turkish mediation includes sage, juniper, rosemary, thyme, peppermint, parsley, pepper, various onions, horseradish and saffron. The spread of maize in Hungary can be attributed to the Turks as well. Among the most well-known and favorite by many is cabbage stuffed with meat and/or rice in vine leaves.

Turkish Fruits: The influence may be also better discovered in the fruits that come to our land … apricots, strawberries, figs, medlar and Mediterranean plants and without them unimaginable in to-day’s Hungarian gastronomy.

We can see that in addition to our food, fruits and spices, the Turkish presence has influenced the long-term formation of our Hungarian dishes. Originally a fermented beverage made from millet, later made from different cereals, boza are very popular in Hungary. In addition to boza, the Turkish coffee as their traditional drink, appears in our country in the 16th century, and many people still to-day prefer to drink Turkish coffee. In the 15th century, like bozo, coffee was used as a medicine in addition to its enjoyment which shows an inpact to the Turkish presence and in our daily drinks.

Some recipes will be shared later, which we still consume to this day.

© Aggie Reiter