Archive for the ‘Herald News for Hungarians who speaks English!’ Category

The Real Hungarian Apple Strudel – Az Igazi Magyar Almás Rétes

The Apple Strudel became popular in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire.

The strudel is often associated with the Austrian cuisine, and also known as a traditional pastry around the whole area of the former Austro-Hungarian empire. Therefore, for many it may sound as a reminder of the Austrian Strudel, which is made of plate feuilletée, but the Hungarian made strudel is more kinda filo dough. The filo dough is similar to middle Eastern or Turkish filo. The traditional Strudel pastry dough is very elastic. It is made from flour with a high gluten content so pardon … to the folks for thier sensivity to gluten)… egg, water and lard. No sugar is added. The dough need to be worked hard and vigorously rested, and then rolled out and stretched by hand very thinly with the help of a clean linen kitchen towel.

By-the-way, the best known strudels are apple strudel, sweet soft quark cheese strudel, followed by sour cherry or sweet cherry strudel or so much loved by Hungarians the poppy seed strudel. The sweet strudels are often served along with cream. Many folks like the savoury strudels and there are some of them: sauerkraut, pumkin, cabbage … soforth … fancy fantasy up to imagination.

Receipt: for 3 rolls (wish more than 3 rolls  lets say 6 rolls then duplicate the amount of ingredients)

Preparing Time: 45-60 mins.

Ingredients: 1 big pack of filo dough cca. 400gr, 1 kg apples, 1/2 tbs ground cinnamon, 150 gr sugar (depending how sweet to taste), 2 tbs breadcrumbs.

Preparation: Peel and core apples then grate them into a big bowl. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, mix well. Lightly dampen a clean dish towel and spread out over a smooth work surface. Press to extract any excess juice. Spread the dough layers on the top of each other over the dish towel and brush with oil.Scetter breadcrumbs lightly onto the last pastry. Sprinkle with walnut. Place the apple filling on the side. Roll up the pastry tightly with the help of the kitchen towel. Brush its top and sides with more oil, so to be crunchy. Bake it in pre-heated oven to 180 C degree for about 15-20 mins.

Don’t Worry … Be Happy … cause it might not have the look as expected of your baking for the first time but it probably taste excellent and keep in mind that you can be an expert  by gaining a little practise.

©  Aggie Reiter

Floating Island – Madár Tej – Hungarian Deliciousness Creamy Dessert

This is another famous and classic easy recipe among Hungarian families.  

The Hungarian “Bird’s milk” – “Madártej” is a vanilla custard containing foam dumplings whipped from egg whites, and originates from France. In 1834 this sweet dessert made from milk and eggs made its way to Hungary as deeply loved delight for sweet tooth individuals.

Bird milk is an imaginary name, more than probably a wandering term that originally referred to an imaginary food (its history dates back to antiquity).

The word bird milk has appeared with different names in many European languages since the middle of the 18th century. The Hungarian name as Bird’s milk – Madártej is known in the world having named differently …

The dessert made its success all through the Continent. It can be found in almost all the countries in Europe and even in India … e.g. “Oeufs á la neige” – (eggs on the snow) or “Ile flottante” – are often available in French bistros. The floating islands are known by the English speakers and also for Spaniards. In addition to us, the Romanians also follow the bird’s milk line. The Austrians go on calling it canary milk “Kanarimilch”. In India, “Rasmala” is made without eggs and cardamom, which is also flavored with pistachios and saffron.

Receipt – Ingredients – for 4 person – peparating time: 20 mins.


For the basic cream … 6 eggs separated, pinch of salt, 150 g sugar, 1 liter milk, 12 g vanilia sugar (1 packet), 3 tbs flour, 10 dkg raisins Instead of the 1 packet of vanilla sugar or a little aroma, if possable choose 1 real vanilla stick, it’s worth it, it gives the bird’s milk a yummy taste.

Step-by-step Cooking … Meringues beat egg whites with a pinch of salt until soft peaks form. Add 3 tbs of sugar and beat until stiff. Bring half of the milk and scraped seeds of vanilla stick to boil in a large pot, then reduce to a simmer. Scoop up egg-sized peices of beaten egg white mixture and gently slide into the simmering milk. When the meringues rise, carefully turn them and cook on the other side. (about 1 min. egy side) Set then after aside.

For the vanilla sauce … add the rest of the milk into the pot and let it start to simmer again. Mix the yorks with the remaining sugar and flour. Add the vanillia suger to the simmering milk. Remove from the heat, pour slowly – ladia-by-ladie – into the york mixture, whisting constannly. Then pour the mixture in the warm milk. Add thróe raisin Place the pot back on to the heat and cook over low heat until the sauce sóbegins to ticken.

To assemble and serve, spoon meringues into a glass bowl. Pour the vanilla souce on top sprinkle with raisins. Best is when cold, so store in the fridge for a while before serving, but maybe in between someone has discovered it and many are missing. Then off you go it only take 20 mins to get this yummy dessert ready again.

© Aggie Reiter

Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli

According to some sources, bejgli is originally from Silesia, a type of cake known in Europe since the 14th century. Others write about Armenian origins, and as is customary, the exact history of origins is obscured by the past. What is certain: bejgli was originally made in the form of a horseshoe, from which its German name is derived, and then it was introduced into the Hungarian language through Austrian mediation in the second half of the 19th century.

According to the old folks saying … if the walnut bejgli gets on the table at Xmas, it protect from spoilage. And also a poppy sead bejgli, then inhabitants of the house be in great abundance and happiness next year. And last but not least … the new year will soon bring a husband to the young girl/s

Surely there are gourmets who improve on the traditions with the Xmas chestnut bejgli with other various fillings.

During the high holiday season in December the scent of the baking  begli in your home is a dream itself.The Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli stands  # 1 for me next to the chestnut, walnut and poppy seed  bejgli.

Now let’s go the the next level … Receipt – Dried Plum-Mazipan Bejgli

Ingredients for 2 roll bejgli: 30 dkg flour, 7.5 dkg butter, 5 dkg of fat, 4 dkg powdered sugar, 1 dkg of yeast, 1 egg yolk, small pinch of salt, 1 dl milk. (+1 egg for greasing the top).

For the marzipan filling: 25 dkg prunes, 15 dkg of marzipan paste, 10 dkg candied minced almonds, 1 dl plum pálinka (but not nessesary, but it brings an extra taste.

Meanwhile prepare the marzipan filling: Cut the marzipan into small cubes and heat it with the sugar, add the prunes soaked in pálinka, and finally add plum jam.

Preparation step-by-step … making bejgli cake:
Sift the flour and then crumble the yeast. Add several ingredients of the dough to the flour and knead the elastic dough from the whole with a machine or quick movements. Divide the kneaded dough into two equal pieces and then form into two loaves from the dough and cover with a kitchen towel a place it at cool place for at least 1 hour. Thenafter, stretch the dough (without undercutting) into a rectangle. When making bejgli,  make sure that the filling and dough are the same amount.Spread the cooled filling on the dough, leaving a 1 cm section on each side. Fold the edges of the dough inwards and then roll up the bejgli evenly. Be sure to make the same amount of filling and dough when making bejgli.

Stir in the egg yolk and thinly with it the bejgli. Place the smeared bejgli in a dry, cold place until the egg layer is dry.

Prick the side of the bejgli (this is needed so that the steam can come out and not crack) and the top. Bake the bejgli in a preheated 180 °C oven.

© Aggie Reiter

One of the Hungarians Most Classic Cake for Xmas – Sugar-free Snowball Cake

As getting closer to the Season Holidays, many are wondering what kinda cake to come up with which is baked so quickly, easy to bake and being heavenly in taste. Naturally, there are many quicky and tasty Hungarian’s love to taste, so tune in or should I say roll over to this site but the meantime give this one a try.

Ingredients:cake pan shape size 26 cm will do just fine.
For the cocoa sponge cake: 8 eggs, 2 tbsp erythritol, 2 tbsp cocoa powder, 1 packet baking powder, 1 pinch of salt, 10 dkg flour, 15 dkg wholemeal flour, 1 dl water
Liquid sweetener equivalent to 20 dkg of sugar
For the cream: 10 dkg flour or 1 packet of coconut pudding powder, 5 dl milk, 4 tbsp coconut shavings, 10 dkg erythritol or liquid sweetener, 20 dkg butter, 5 tbsp erythritol
Covering the outside: about 10 dkg of coconut shavings
On the topping: 1 bar of sugar-free chocolate, 2 teaspoons of oil.

Baking instructions:
For the sponge cake, separate the eggs and beat the protein to a foam with the erythritol. Cocoa powder, baking powder, salt and flour are mixed. Stir in the egg yolks in the protein mousse, in small portions, then add the water and flour alternately to the dough gently to keep the dough frothy and gently stir in the sweetener. Bake in a buttered, floured cake tin at 180 degrees for about 20 minutes. When cooled, cut into three parts.

For the cream: Mix the custard powder (flour) with a little milk. Bring the remaining milk to a boil point, then pour in the custard powder and cook until thickened, stir in the coconut, sweetener and allow to cool. Stir the butter into the foam with the erythritol and then work together with the cooled coconut cream. When assembling the cake, smear the sponge cakes with the cream and then layer the sheets on top of each other … the top sheet should be the smoothest sponge cake … spread the top only thinly with cream, but spread around the side thicker, thereafter also sprinkle with coconut shavings … may garnished also be to covered with chocolate chips. Melt the chocolate with oil on top of the cake over water vapor and spread on top of the cake. Place in the fridge until it gets slightly frosty.

It’s soft, creamy, coconut and even chocolatey, so it’s basically incapable and very delicious.  It looks so good that it fits anytime and very well on the Xmas table too!

© Aggie Reiter

“Hanukkah” in the Air Tonight – “Festival of Light” – Tradition – Story – Food @ 2020

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday, often referred to as the “Festival of Lights.”

Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days and nights.

The Hebrew calendar determines when Hanukkah begins and ends each year, which is based on the lunar cycle and the seasons. It was created in ancient times based on observations of the appearance of the crescent moon. This means that the dates of holidays vary from year to year based not on the Gregorian calendar but on the phases of the moon (which last 29.5 days). Some years are longer or shorter than others, but instead of adding a leap day every four years, the Hebrew calendar adds a full lunar month to seven out of every 19 years. The Chinese calendar is also calculated based on a combination of the movement of the moon and the sun. Following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar.

In 2020 Hanukkah runs from the evening of December, 10 to the last candle lighting evening of Dec. 18.

Not at all Jewish Xmas, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in the second century B.C. The Hanukkah story is based on historical events that took place in 165 BCE in Jerusalem. After the Second Temple in Jerusalem was desecrated by the Seleucid Emperor Antiochus IV and his Greco-Syrian troops, Jewish priest Mattathias and his sons rebelled. Retaking Jerusalem and the Temple, they lit the holy lamp (the menorah) but had only enough oil for one night. Miraculously, the lamp stayed lit for eight days until enough holy oil could be procured.

Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday and it became a more significant holiday in the western world because of its proximity to Xmas and the desire among more secular Jews to participate in the cultural build-up to the winter solstice. Also as a result, gift-giving became more popular in the west than in other parts of the world. While the traditions of Hanukkah are similar around the world, each country has its own unique twist.

Hanukkah means “Dedication” and also called Feast of Dedication, Festival of Lights, aka Feast of the Maccabees, or Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days. Hanukkah reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting of candles as the sun goes down on each day of the festival.

All over the world, candlelight celebrations are celebrated in some form. Let’s visit some parts of the World, what and how they are celebrating …

In parts of France, for example, families light a double-decker (16-candle) menorah, while in Morocco fried treats are made with fruit juice and orange zest.

Butter sculpture – Buddhist New Year’s custom. It is also a Tibetan custom for Buddhist monks to carve meticulously made statues of yak butter at New Year’s Eve, bringing to life a different story and teaching tale each year. The statues sometimes reach a height of 10 meters and are illuminated by special butter lamps. The most successful sculptures will receive an award.

Solstice in Scotland: The Feast of Solstice is held on the eve of the shortest day of the year. In the first millennium of our time, the ancestors of the Scots today, the Druids, celebrated the God of the Sun at solstice, rejoicing that it would then return and become stronger again. The customs still live today in Vikkan traditions, in English-speaking areas, and in various variations in other parts of the world. A large block of wood — the Column of Julias — is set up in the middle of a clearing and set on fire. Everyone then dances around the fire. It is said that the more noise they make, the better, because it awakens the god of the sun and thus the process of revival.

Night of Hikes – Mexico:  An unusual ceremony takes place in Oaxaca, Mexico on December 23 each year. It began in the middle of the last century when the Spaniards brought the first radish to Mexico. In Oaxaca, they grow very large, but due to the stony soil, they turn into all sorts of strange, twisted shapes. Local folk artists then carve all sorts of interesting things out of these, scenes from the Bible, and local Aztec legends. Cash prizes will be won by the best sculptors and the evening will end with a dazzling fireworks display.

Befana – Italy: “Bifana” – a friendly witch, flies down the chimneys on a broom to place presents in the hanged stockings. Legend has it that Bifana was just sweeping when the Three Kings knocked on him. They offered to take it with them, but he said he didn’t have time. He changed his mind later, but it was too late. That’s why he still goes into every house at Christmas and leaves gifts everywhere.

China New Year: It begins on the first day of the New Moon and ends fifteen days later, at full moon. The fifteenth day is called the Lampion Festival, the celebration begins after sunset when lanterns are lit all over and people march through the streets with lanterns hanging on their sticks in their hands.

The Chinese calendar is calculated following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar. It is about 29.5 days long. To correct the shift, the Chinese occasionally insert an extra year into the calendar, a total of seven times during a 19-year cycle. This is the same as the way we do an extra day  a.k.a. leap year every four years at the end of February. However, this is the reason why according to the day-based calendar, Chinese New Year always falls on a different date.

Dozmocse – Celebration of the Dying Year in Tibet: The center of the five-day celebration is a column adorned with stars and other decorations made of colored yarn. Dancers wearing scary masks bounce around to scare away bad spirits for years to come. The next few days will be filled with daring and prayers, and as a finale, the people will knock down the pillar together and take apart the decorations.

One of the cakes connected to Hanukkah is the Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnuts. These delicious dessert treats are made with yeast and must be allowed to rise. They’re often topped with confectioners sugar and/or in-and-out-side with home-made apricot jam. Yeast is allowed in foods year-round except during the Passover holiday when Jews eat unleavened bread in commemoration of their flight from Egypt (as described in the Old Testament).

Receipt … Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnut

Overall time from preparation to consumption: 1 hour 45 minutes

Ingredients for 20 piece of donuts: 2.5 dl milk, 30 g yeast, 1 month + 50 g powdered sugar, 500 g fine flour, salt, 6 egg yolks, 60 g soft butter / margarine, frying oil
vanilla powdered sugar for sprinkling

Preparation: Lighten the milk, mix in 1 dl of yeast and 1 tbs. icing sugar. Sift the flour into a bowl, make a recess in the middle, pour in the yeast milk, mix a little flour from the edges, then cover with a kitchen towel and let it double, i.e. make sourdough (15 minutes). In the remaining 1.5 dl of lukewarm milk, mix the remaining 50 g of icing sugar, 1 pinch of salt and egg yolks, then add to the flour and work together with a wooden spoon. Knead the butter / margarine in 2-3 portions, cover and double-boil in a warm place (30 minutes). Knead the dough on a floured worktop, flatten and flatten with a floury palm, and puncture with a 6-8 cm diameter cake tongue (or glass) dipped in flour (knead the falling parts without flour, re-tear). The discs are stacked at a distance of 5 cm on a floured tray or board, the tops are lightly smeared with oil (so as not to crust), then covered loosely first with folpack and then with a kitchen towel and doubled again. Pour 2-3 fingers of oil into a medium-sized pan (25-28 cm in diameter) and heat it – it should not be smoky-hot, because the outside of the donut will blush too soon, but it is feared that the middle will remain semi-raw! Press the center of the dough discs with your thumb and place them in the oil with the half that was on top (about 4-5 pieces because they will grow during baking). Cover the legs (this will make them “ribbon”), bake the donuts on a moderate heat for 4-5 minutes, then turn them over with a sieve spoon and bake them until golden brown without a lid. Soak up the excess oil on a paper towel, arrange on a preheated bowl, sprinkle with vanilla powdered sugar and serve freshly hot. Home-made apricot jam in-and-outside of the donutsnare just heavenly. Also may have them aside and in a separate bowl.

© Aggie Reiter

Just in Time … Traditional Hungarian Scone with Pork or Goose Cracklings  – Sertés vagy Liba Tepertős Pogácsa

The cake is one of the oldest and most popular baked goods in the Hungarian-inhabited areas, but also in many other nations. The origin of the name is derived from the Latin word focus – fire. Although at first its sound not similar to that used in Hungaria, but when we think of the fried dough of Italian bakeries – the Latin focacea – it sounds more familiar. To this day, Italians call focaccia the flatter, smaller variety of bread. The Hungarian language took the name South Slavic pogača (which originally meant pie). In most European countries, “cake” baking sounds familiar. “Pogatschen” for the Germans, “poğaça” for the Turks,”hogaza” for the Spanish, and “fougasse” for the French.

From time travel, let’s just jump back to the present … Hungarians make typical cakes for the coming Xmas feasts, but the Pogács – Scone is popular to bake anytime throughout the 365 days of the year.  It is also a national yummy with wide spread of stuffings. There are so many varieties of  fillings of the “Pogácsa” – “Scone” with different flavors such as: cheese, potato, goose cracklings, sour cream, cottage cheese, sheep’s cheese, crumbly, cabbage, butter, different seeds, onion, green spice, and of course there can be different variations of them, regardless of the variety. In addition to the traditional flavors, may  find at different regions different fillings …  broccoli, chili, wild onion (especially in the town Orfű), bean (City of Sopron).

After a hearty heavy soup …  let’s say the “goulash soup” Scone with Pork or Goose chopped cracklings Tepertős Pogácsa is really heavenly!

Here is a reminder to the Gyulás heavy soup receipt: https://rollinginbudapest.com/2020/05/06/a-1000-year-history-cuisine-of-hungary/ along another receipt of beloved chesse scone – sajtós pogácsa.

Receipt to the Traditional Hungarian Scone Pork or Goose cracklings  –  Sertés vagy Liba Tepertős pogácsa

Preparation time cca. 2 hours. Cooking time ½ an hour up 1 hour.

Ingredients: 60ml /4 tbsp milk, 1 tsp dried yeast, 250g pork or goose chopped cracklings, 500g plain flour – plus extra for dusting, 1 tsp baking powder, ½ tsp salt, 2 tbsp grated parmesan or as taste, 1 tbsp caraway seeds, 120g unsalted butter, 120 ml soured cream,  2 eggs beaten, to cover the scone with beaten egg and a drop of water, to glaze.

Preparation: Gently heat the milk in a pan until it is lukewarm, then pour it into a jug and stir in the yeast. Leave it for 15 mins or so to get working and froth up. Meanwhile, heat a heavy-based pan with the already fried craklings a bits until crisp and golden. Remove them from the pan and leave to cool. Sift the flour into a bowl and mix with the baking powder and salt. Stir in the parmesan or other cheese and caraway seeds. Put the butter in a small pan over a gentle heat and allow it to melt until it is just liquid. Take the pan off the heat, stir in the soured cream and add the beaten eggs – make sure the butter isn’t too hot or the eggs will scramble. Add the cooled crispy cracklings and stir in the yeasty milk. Pour the buttery egg and chopped mixture into a large bowl, then add the flour and other dry ingredients, for a short time, until everything is combined. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and knead for 5 mins or so until elastic. You can do this with a mixer and a dough hook as you like. Put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with oiled cling film and leave it in a draught-free place for about an 1½ hours until it has doubled in size.

Baking: Turn the dough out again and knock it back with your knuckles. Dust the dough with flour and roll it out to about 4 cm in thick  length.

Preheat the oven to 200 C / 400 F. Place on the a baking tray a baking sheet. Then place and leave  the pogácsa  scone to rest for another 10 mins before putting into the oven.  Brush the scone with the beaten egg and water to glaze and bake them for 25–30 mins until top just begins to turn golden.

© Aggie Reiter

Collection of Wonders – Extended Art Movie Rental With 30+ Online Movies

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In the current situation, at the movie theaters screenings will pause, but of course to ensure that art lovers are not left without interesting sights during cinema closures, the Pannonia Entertainment Ltd., has made available all the previous parts from the series of the “Temple of Art”. Expanded with 9 new films nd nearly 30 art history films, having access to earlier parts of the series at the online movie rental launched by distributor Pannonia Entertainment Ltd. Thus offer is huge and surely provide unmissable artistic experience and real relaxation to watch all episodes in your own enviroment in a comfy setting. Within the screenings, from the very first 2014 film about the Vatican Museum to the latest Modigliani Centenary, which was released in late October 2020.

Art film screenings started six years ago with the “Temple of Art” movie series, the episodes of which showcase outstanding artists, masterpieces and museums of universal art in a spectacular mainly large-screen design.

Fresh creations such as the 2020 episodes depicting the lives of Amadeo Modigliani, Frida Kahlo, Paul Gauguin and Peggy Guggenheim can also be viewed from home.

In addition to the award-winning music documentary art films – including Ella Fitzgerald and Ronnie Wood‘s film portrait – biographical films (Egon Schiele, Mary Shelley, Gagarin) and Hungarian natural history (Wild Forests, Wild Crags) which are also available on the site … http://www.pannonia-entertainment.hu/filmkolcsonzo page.

What’s new in the offer?

With the current expansion of the movie rental, 7 new films have been added to the selection, which were recently shown across Hungary’s cinemas theaters.
The Prado Museum – Collection of Miracles has become available … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mngYaQHab8w
… Episode of St. Petersburg’s Monumental Museum, also known as the Venice of the North – Hermitage – The Power of Arthttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSDau6_Ut94
Gauguin in Tahiti presents the legendary art eternal rebel, Paul Gauguin’s footsteps, who was in Tahiti and the islands Marquieses-researched through Paris to Brittany on after the “lost paradise”… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3vFvTi–pg
… The rare impressionist art history speaks revolution launched by the movement in fifty from private collections, exhibited for the first time valuable paintings – including Manet, Caillebotte, Renoir, Monet, Cézanne, Signac, Sisley and Berthe Morisot‘s works … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DD-L2aCgJzU
Frida Kahlo multifaceted personality, pioneering and revolutionary art and culture to become an icon processing Viva la Vida, which evokes Frida own words based on letters, diary and personal confessions … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWThZuVlakM
… The cinema shows obsessed by the 20th century’s most famous art collector and art patron, Marguerite “Peggy” Guggenheim career in a comprehensive manner … ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnMBBh_SBJw
… The list of what’s new in arts movie rental was part of the latest, the end of the series hits theaters in October, close to the centenary Modigliani, in which avant-garde of the 20th century Italian painter and sculptor Amadeo Modigliani‘s life and art from a new perspective, life partner, Jeanne Hébuterne memoirs revealed … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5q4ECvPLERY

Movies can be played an unlimited number of times within 48 hours of rental, on any device that is suitable for internet access: on a computer, tablet, smartphone or even a mobile phone – although the latter is less recommended due to its small screen size.

Here’s a peak into last week’s rental movies to have hit the Top10 chart:
1. Peggy Guggenheim – Obsessed with art
2. Gauguin Tahitin – The Lost Paradise
3. Hermitage – The power of art
4. The Prado Museum – Collection of Miracles
5. Modigliani centenary
6. Impressionist rarities
7. Hokuszai: Beyond the big wave
8. Frida Kahlo – Viva la Vida
9. Raffaello – The Prince of Painting
10. Tintoretto – A rebel in Venice

Reviews of some films from the past can also be found @ rollinginbudapest.com – “Temple of Art” series”

Wishing everyone to persevere during the harder period due to the coronavirus situation, take care of yourselves and each other.

© Aggie Reiter

Amrita Sher-Gil – Greatest Avantgarde Women Artists of the Early 20th Century

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Struggling for days out of ideas as for many just “sit and wait” for their lockdown to end … Below is a riport/update shared for the rollinginbudapest readers to enloose a bit and enjoy the reading.

Riport based on … gain through Webniar on the Life and Art of Amrita Sher-Gil at the Indian Cultural Center in Budapest. During the Webinar several India art professionals joined the gathering and spoke about the legendary artist life. Amrita Sher-Gil, as a Hungarian and an Indian, a European and an Asian, belonged to both cultures, creating a synthesis between modern European and traditional Indian painting.

Amrita Sher-Gil was an extraordinary painter of the 20th-century whose legacy stands on a par with the Masters of Bengal Renaissance.

About the name of the Indian Cutural Center – Budapest … in 2013 a ceremony was held to name the cutural institution to be Amrita Sher-Gil.  At the time being, Ambassador Malay Mishra and art historian Katalin Keserü spoke about the naming Amrita Sher-Gil at the event, which also celebrated in time India’s 67th anniversary of independence. The culture center is just a few steps from the Embassy of India – Budapest.

A flashback to her early life and history: Amrita Sher-Gil born January, 30. 1913 in Budapest, Amrita’s father was an Indian Sikh aristocrat with a deep scholarly interest in Sanskrit and astronomy. Her Hungarian-Jewish mother Marie Antoinette Gottesmann was an opera artist. Throughout the short years Amrita Sher-Gil led a life as compelling and unorthodox as her art. The Indian artist spent her early life in a village of Hungary and at the age eight her family shifted to Shimla which was considered as a stunning hilly venue of India. Shimla was the place which marked the beginning of Amrita’s love for art and there she began receiving formal education on the subject of art from an Italian sculptor. The painter moved to Italy in 1924 and Amrita, along with her mother, followed him. Soon enough, she joined a Roman Catholic institution called Santa Anunciata. This was the place where she witnessed the miraculous works of Italian artists and got inspired from them. Showed interest and took formal lessons completing her formal studies at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris at the age of sixteen. Sher-Gil painted her airly Bohemian life in Paris, a series of self-portraits, which showed her grappling with her own identity caught between Europe and India. In Paris, she was greatly influenced by European painters like Paul Cézanne, Amedeo Modigliani and Paul Gauguin. Despite in 1929 her early success in Paris, she increasingly longed for India and finally returned to her home country in 1934, finding the inspiration she needed as she traveled around the country and reconnected with its people. At this point, was ways of seeing changes radically in India. This was the beginning of her life-long journey of trying to decode the traditions of Indian art. She deeply thought her new style diverged greatly from her previous works learned in Paris, but she realized that Europe belonged to the art likers of Picasso and Matisse while India belonged to her. The influence of Western painting traditions are apparent in her early works, most notably seem to evoke the poverty, sadness and monumental gravity of the people she saw around her.

One of her paintings  The “Group of Young Girls”  a powerful work done in earthy colors portraying three, young girls waiting pensively for their future received Gold medal at Grand Salon Paris – 1933., and also won a Gold medal from Bombay Art Society – 1937. 

Overall, on one hand, Amrita was passionate about everything life had to offer and on the other hand, she harbored a deep sense of melancholy. Amrita  Sher-Gil  was often referred as India’s Frida Kahlo.”The Two Fridas” play was introduced in the UK as storytelling through dance and music. (Writer’s note … Would be great to bring the UK’s preformance over to Budapest  Hungary!)

In the year 1938, Amrita married her Hungarian first cousin, Dr. Victor Egan. Afterwards, she moved to the city of Gorakhpur, where her paternal family resided, with her beloved husband. Later on, the couple decided to move to Lahore which was a part of the undivided India. Sadly, in the year 1941, Amrita Sher-Gill left the world and gone ahead.

Amrita Sher-Gill was the first and youngest only Asian artist. Her works show a considerable amount of influence from the west and her deep passion, along with a great sense of understanding towards colors, shows why the artist is considered remarkable even in today’s times.

The masterworks of this artist have been declared as National Art Treasures by the Government – India and a majority of her creations adorn the beauty of the famous National Gallery of Modern Art – capital of India.In addition to this, as paying respect to the great artist, there is a road by the name of Amrita Sher-Gill Marg in Delhi.

In 2001 the Ernst Museum Budapest held an exhibition on Amrita’s painting which were introduced  to the Hungarian art lovers for the first time in Hungary.

On the occasion of the 100th anniversary (2013) of her birth was seen on the fence at the Hungarian National Museum giant tableau 50 arts namely “exhibition fence.”  In January of the same year, was erected a marble plaque at her birthplace District I, Budapest: Szilágy Dezső Square. Also in 2013 UNESCO announced  to be the international year of Amrita Sher-Gil.

During her short but productive career, she influenced generations. Amrita left behind 175 substantial body of works of which 95 works are at the National Museum – Delhi and some are at private collectors. However, the artist has been overlooked for decades, only the past recent times receiving the recognition she deserves.

Update Aggie Reiter

Zsolnay Light Festival – Painted Jami Building with Light @ City of Pécs

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Unfortunetely, due to the situation caused by COVID-19, the Zsonaly Light Festival @ the City of Pécs, planned for the summer of 2020, couldn’t take place.

The organizers, i.e. the state of Zsonaly Heritage Management Ltd. have been working hard in recent weeks not to let the light being out of order and make the most out of the situation in our daily situation. Photos Péter Marsalkó

Therefore, every night from November, 27. to December, 20. from 4.30 p.m. – 7.30 p.m. –  Jami of Széchenyi Square will be dressed up in a light robe. The light artists of the LaLuz Visuals creative group made it happen to enjoy the brilliant sight and make the difficult period better during the Holiday Season a little better.

The biggest light festival in the country is awaiting its visitors.

© Aggie Reiter

5th ArteKino Festival – December, 1-31. 2020.

During the Convid-19 Pandemic effect, not being able to go and sit enjoying movies at the cinemas therefore an attempt was made by the ArteKino organisers to make this year’s selection reachable in watch at home even more colorful selectionof moves than before. The organizers welcome cinema fans to make these hard times easier with online screenings of documentaries that mix with fiction and various combinations of these. Drama taps into comedy and then hyperrealism. We see European conflicts through the eyes of young filmmakers, with a new approach, overwhelming empathy and parade dramaturgy. Cat in the Wall is one of my favorite but also warmly recommended films for Ivana the Terrible, Son of Sofia, and Motherland. The film screened in original language with English/Hungarian subtitles.

Movies are available for free from December, 1-31. 2020 between the following link, after a quick registration: https://www.artekinofestival.com

Since it was first launched, ARTE has always championed a shared foundation of European cultural values by placing imagination and pluralism at the heart of its project. This European ideal pervades all its programmes and, thanks to digital technology, the channel is now able to share it with more and more Europeans. A genuine cultural policy cannot be the sole preserve of “those in the know”, it only makes sense if it is open to everyone, especially those who have no access to culture or may feel excluded.This is why ARTE is keen to address audiences where they are most likely to be found – on digital networks. The ArteKino festival, launched in 2016, is symbolic of ARTE’s ambition to promote the riches of European arthouse cinema and share them with as many people as possible.

For its fifth edition ArteKino Festival is showing a selection of 10 European films that have been made by young filmmakers, and which are freely available in 10 languages in 45 countries across Europe. Our aim is to create new links between works, their creators and a large audience that is keen to discover new and relevant views on contemporary concerns and themes. In an everchanging landscape, these films, fictions and documentaries offer a lens through which we can see our world, and decipher our link with history.

The ten feature length films, made by creators from ten different countries, pay homage to the cultural and linguistic diversity found across Europe. Our selection highlights new creators and their diverse sources of inspiration, along with how they address geopolitical changes and intimate crises. Being either documentaries or fiction, or blending the borders between the two, these films offer a range of views, from melancholic to cheerful, of a transforming world.

Established by the ArteKino Foundation, the festival has benefited from the support of Europe Media Créative as well as private sponsors. The ArteKino Foundation also supports feature length projects through the “ArteKino International Prize”, a bursary to help with their development, which has been awarded at a dozen large film festivals. Also, through “ArteKino Selection” a film or series is made freely available on ARTE’s three digital cinemas: artekinofestival.com, arte.tv, and the YouTube channel ARTE Cinéma.

Olivier Père, ArteKino Festival Artistic Director
Rémi Burah, President of the ArteKino Foundation

source: ArteKino

Update: Aggie Reiter