Posts Tagged ‘Hungary’

Estas Tonne – Essential Sounds of the Universe coming to Hungary

Estas Tonne  will be holding a concert as a stop of his  international VISION Tour

Thursday, October 21, 2021. starting 7 p.m. – MOMKult – Budapest

The concert will be held at MOMKult on behalf of the Fonó Buda Music Hall.

Due to the epidemic situation, Estas Tonne’s 2020 international autumn tour will arrive in Budapest with the theme originally planned for 2021.

Music is an intangible and elusive branch of art that can effectively influence our inner vision, which is why the tour was named VISION. “Telling a story with music that has no text is a special way of expressing it. The student can create the story that suits him or her without the narrator saying anything. Of course, I also experiment with songs, poems, and stories. Among them are things that are no longer important at all and there are some that come naturally.” so had the artist admits.
Join Tonne’s spiritual journey, pushing the boundaries of our inner into revelation.

Estas Tonne was born in Russia and started playing guitar at the age of eight. He moved to Israel with his family in the 1990s and then took his trip to New York, where he had just arrived a week after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He met street musician Michael Shulman, with whom he later performed at the 9/11 anniversary commemoration, and also released a joint album. Tonne as a street musician.

He has turned up in many places from Mexico to India, hence the name gipsy troubadour or modern troubadour. He uses his instrument as if it were a whole band. He plays a six-string acoustic guitar without plucking, combining the solo with rhythm and walking bass. Today he is a guest of many major festivals around the world. In 2014, he joined performed at the Everness Festival in Hungary.

Tickets can be purchased to his concert  to a/m date through: https://fono.jegy.hu/?lang=en

© Aggie Reiter

Safe place to visit in-and-around the City of Miskolc

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According to the up-to-date news from Miskolc Tourist Ltd. from January, 15. –  February, 1. 2021., there will certainly be considered restrictive in tourism measures that for the time being make most tourist attractions inaccessible. However, there are many opportunities for those wishing to move out from the closed door in this COVID situation, where safe conditions may in full compliance with the rules enjoy the sights-and-sounds of the winter surroundings, and gain experiences of the mother nature sleeping.

Arriving to the City, recommend head to the Tourist Information Office and pick up your interactive map that will be handy through rolling around  plenty of  offering sites, also adding the history of a venue.  Worth to explore its surroundings even this week-end and/or the coming week-end ahead.

Just a couple of handy tips to visit whilst being at the area Miskolc:

Lillafüred forest small train, Lillafüredi Trout farm, 200-year-old Újmassa precocious building, Bánkuti Ski Center, Petőfi lookout tower, Szentléleki Monastery ruin, Palace hotel, Szinva stream waterfall,
Maple Hill – Oxygen walking path, Our Lady of Pauline Monastery stones, Diósgyőr Castle, Fairy Garden leisure park.

In advance here’s a mood doer to enjoy your visit @ Miskolc in English Language:

https://www.hellomiskolc.hu/portal_page.php?pageID=285&language=en

© Aggie Reiter

“Hanukkah” in the Air Tonight – “Festival of Light” – Tradition – Story – Food @ 2020

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday, often referred to as the “Festival of Lights.”

Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days and nights.

The Hebrew calendar determines when Hanukkah begins and ends each year, which is based on the lunar cycle and the seasons. It was created in ancient times based on observations of the appearance of the crescent moon. This means that the dates of holidays vary from year to year based not on the Gregorian calendar but on the phases of the moon (which last 29.5 days). Some years are longer or shorter than others, but instead of adding a leap day every four years, the Hebrew calendar adds a full lunar month to seven out of every 19 years. The Chinese calendar is also calculated based on a combination of the movement of the moon and the sun. Following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar.

In 2020 Hanukkah runs from the evening of December, 10 to the last candle lighting evening of Dec. 18.

Not at all Jewish Xmas, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in the second century B.C. The Hanukkah story is based on historical events that took place in 165 BCE in Jerusalem. After the Second Temple in Jerusalem was desecrated by the Seleucid Emperor Antiochus IV and his Greco-Syrian troops, Jewish priest Mattathias and his sons rebelled. Retaking Jerusalem and the Temple, they lit the holy lamp (the menorah) but had only enough oil for one night. Miraculously, the lamp stayed lit for eight days until enough holy oil could be procured.

Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday and it became a more significant holiday in the western world because of its proximity to Xmas and the desire among more secular Jews to participate in the cultural build-up to the winter solstice. Also as a result, gift-giving became more popular in the west than in other parts of the world. While the traditions of Hanukkah are similar around the world, each country has its own unique twist.

Hanukkah means “Dedication” and also called Feast of Dedication, Festival of Lights, aka Feast of the Maccabees, or Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days. Hanukkah reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting of candles as the sun goes down on each day of the festival.

All over the world, candlelight celebrations are celebrated in some form. Let’s visit some parts of the World, what and how they are celebrating …

In parts of France, for example, families light a double-decker (16-candle) menorah, while in Morocco fried treats are made with fruit juice and orange zest.

Butter sculpture – Buddhist New Year’s custom. It is also a Tibetan custom for Buddhist monks to carve meticulously made statues of yak butter at New Year’s Eve, bringing to life a different story and teaching tale each year. The statues sometimes reach a height of 10 meters and are illuminated by special butter lamps. The most successful sculptures will receive an award.

Solstice in Scotland: The Feast of Solstice is held on the eve of the shortest day of the year. In the first millennium of our time, the ancestors of the Scots today, the Druids, celebrated the God of the Sun at solstice, rejoicing that it would then return and become stronger again. The customs still live today in Vikkan traditions, in English-speaking areas, and in various variations in other parts of the world. A large block of wood — the Column of Julias — is set up in the middle of a clearing and set on fire. Everyone then dances around the fire. It is said that the more noise they make, the better, because it awakens the god of the sun and thus the process of revival.

Night of Hikes – Mexico:  An unusual ceremony takes place in Oaxaca, Mexico on December 23 each year. It began in the middle of the last century when the Spaniards brought the first radish to Mexico. In Oaxaca, they grow very large, but due to the stony soil, they turn into all sorts of strange, twisted shapes. Local folk artists then carve all sorts of interesting things out of these, scenes from the Bible, and local Aztec legends. Cash prizes will be won by the best sculptors and the evening will end with a dazzling fireworks display.

Befana – Italy: “Bifana” – a friendly witch, flies down the chimneys on a broom to place presents in the hanged stockings. Legend has it that Bifana was just sweeping when the Three Kings knocked on him. They offered to take it with them, but he said he didn’t have time. He changed his mind later, but it was too late. That’s why he still goes into every house at Christmas and leaves gifts everywhere.

China New Year: It begins on the first day of the New Moon and ends fifteen days later, at full moon. The fifteenth day is called the Lampion Festival, the celebration begins after sunset when lanterns are lit all over and people march through the streets with lanterns hanging on their sticks in their hands.

The Chinese calendar is calculated following the lunar cycle just as in the Jewish calendar. It is about 29.5 days long. To correct the shift, the Chinese occasionally insert an extra year into the calendar, a total of seven times during a 19-year cycle. This is the same as the way we do an extra day  a.k.a. leap year every four years at the end of February. However, this is the reason why according to the day-based calendar, Chinese New Year always falls on a different date.

Dozmocse – Celebration of the Dying Year in Tibet: The center of the five-day celebration is a column adorned with stars and other decorations made of colored yarn. Dancers wearing scary masks bounce around to scare away bad spirits for years to come. The next few days will be filled with daring and prayers, and as a finale, the people will knock down the pillar together and take apart the decorations.

One of the cakes connected to Hanukkah is the Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnuts. These delicious dessert treats are made with yeast and must be allowed to rise. They’re often topped with confectioners sugar and/or in-and-out-side with home-made apricot jam. Yeast is allowed in foods year-round except during the Passover holiday when Jews eat unleavened bread in commemoration of their flight from Egypt (as described in the Old Testament).

Receipt … Sufganiyot which are deep-fried jelly doughnut

Overall time from preparation to consumption: 1 hour 45 minutes

Ingredients for 20 piece of donuts: 2.5 dl milk, 30 g yeast, 1 month + 50 g powdered sugar, 500 g fine flour, salt, 6 egg yolks, 60 g soft butter / margarine, frying oil
vanilla powdered sugar for sprinkling

Preparation: Lighten the milk, mix in 1 dl of yeast and 1 tbs. icing sugar. Sift the flour into a bowl, make a recess in the middle, pour in the yeast milk, mix a little flour from the edges, then cover with a kitchen towel and let it double, i.e. make sourdough (15 minutes). In the remaining 1.5 dl of lukewarm milk, mix the remaining 50 g of icing sugar, 1 pinch of salt and egg yolks, then add to the flour and work together with a wooden spoon. Knead the butter / margarine in 2-3 portions, cover and double-boil in a warm place (30 minutes). Knead the dough on a floured worktop, flatten and flatten with a floury palm, and puncture with a 6-8 cm diameter cake tongue (or glass) dipped in flour (knead the falling parts without flour, re-tear). The discs are stacked at a distance of 5 cm on a floured tray or board, the tops are lightly smeared with oil (so as not to crust), then covered loosely first with folpack and then with a kitchen towel and doubled again. Pour 2-3 fingers of oil into a medium-sized pan (25-28 cm in diameter) and heat it – it should not be smoky-hot, because the outside of the donut will blush too soon, but it is feared that the middle will remain semi-raw! Press the center of the dough discs with your thumb and place them in the oil with the half that was on top (about 4-5 pieces because they will grow during baking). Cover the legs (this will make them “ribbon”), bake the donuts on a moderate heat for 4-5 minutes, then turn them over with a sieve spoon and bake them until golden brown without a lid. Soak up the excess oil on a paper towel, arrange on a preheated bowl, sprinkle with vanilla powdered sugar and serve freshly hot. Home-made apricot jam in-and-outside of the donutsnare just heavenly. Also may have them aside and in a separate bowl.

© Aggie Reiter

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Canceled Their European/Budapest Concert

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds would have originally performed @ Budapest this summer, but it was canceled by the band in March. Then, due to a European tour, it turned out that they would afterall arrive in Budapest on May, 13. 2021., and hold their concert, but it seems as for the time being, this date has also become questionable, after the band has now signaled that the entire European tour will be blown away concert and will also be missed. The band had made their statement, hoping they can come up with better news next year.

The tickets purchased online are automatic at ticket sellers, and the Ticketportal initiates a refund. The amount of the ticvket(s) will be refunded to the account from which the purchase was made. Holders of tickets purchased online have nothing to do. Due to the large number of tickets sold, the refunding is expected to take place by January, 31. 2021.

Tickets purchased in person can be redeemed at the point of purchase. If the given office is not open, a copy of the ticket must be sent by e-mail to ticketportal@ticketportal.hu, no later than January, 15. 2021.

Update: Aggie Reiter

The 9th Jewish & Israeli Film Festival – Online Event @ Hungary

This year as well just as in the previous years don’t have to miss the Best of the Jewish and Israeli films @ the 9th ZIFF film festival which will be screened exclusively online by remote cinema system between November, 24 and December, 6. 2020. Within the framework of the festival, the best films of recent years will be “screened” around Hungary throughout 2 weeks.

During this period a broad line-up of the latest movies depicting to-day’s Jewish culture, heritage and lifestyle will be introduced. The Jewish and Israeli Film Festival is the largest event of its kind in Central and Eastern Europe. Within the year’s program will features a fresh selection of recent pictures from the Germany, United States, Russia, Norway, France, Israel, Austria and Hungary.

The online streeningss will be accessible on computers, tablets and mobile phones. All the movies in original languages with Hungarian subtitles.

The organiser of the Film Festival is the JCC Budapest – Bálint House. The main sponsors of the event are the Hungarian Jewish Social Assistance Foundation, the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the Thalheimer family and both Embassies in Hungary, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the State of Israel.

In brief mentioning two films as highlights during the festival. Opening film “Resistance” on November 24. 8 p.m. and further dates: November, 28. 8 p.m., November, 29 3.30 p.m., December, 3. 8 p.m. … The true story of Marcel Marceau, the most famous pantomime artist of all time, who, as a novice actor as a member of the French resistance in World War II, rescued thousands of children from certain death with his companions.

Also on screen will be “GOLDA” Meir, a generation of founding fathers and mohers, provides a captivating insight. She was Israel’s first and so far only female prime minister, whose family fled the pogroms into the new world, who became a socialist Zionist in Wisconsin who defended and built Israel for decades. Vaslady was a grandmother and founder of the state. The documentary provides a captivating insight into the life of the “Queen of the Jews”. Screenings: November, 25. 6 p.m. and December, 6., 4 p.m.

Ticket sales will start on November, 12. 2020. – http://www.zsifi.org

Tickets can be purchased for the dates on the show, allowing ticket buyers to watch the movie at the time the movies are screened. Tickets price 1500HUF.
The process of buying tickets … may find information about movies and screening times in the “MOVIES” or “PROGRAM” menu and can also buy tickets from there. The movies can be viewed online at the specified time(s) – like at a real movie theater. That means with the purchased ticket, unlike streaming services, can watch the selected movie at any time. Tickets can only be purchased online by credit card payment. After the purchase, the ticket will be sent to the e-mail address you provided. Click the big green button in the email to enter the show, from where may proceed to the Lounge 1 hour before the start time. The start of the projection is indicated by a triple gong and can start watching the movie by clicking the flashing black button.

The main patron of the festival is Gergely Karácsony – Mayor of Budapest

© Aggie Reiter

Favorit One For The Day – Chicken Breats Dubarry with Rice – Dubarry Csirkemell Rizzsel

Chicken Dubarry aka Chicken Cauliflower Casserole one of the most comforting meals ever!

A food that is really popular with Hungarians. Dubarry chicken breast is one of my favorit foods. Simple, lively, elegant, and very delicious. If you haven’t already tasted it then give it a try now! Simple and great lunch idea made from cauliflower and chicken breast.

Serving  for 4  – Preparation time 30 mins –  Baking 30 mins.

Ingredients: 2 pieces, cca 1 kg of chicken breast (whole, fillet), cooking oil, 1 kg cauliflower, salt.

Cooking cauliflower: The cleaned, washed, cut off the cauliflower tubers from the stem, wash them, and place the rose-picked cauliflower in mild hot salted water. Cook them until soft in cca 20 mins. Then filtered, drained and allowed to cool.

Cooking chicken breast: Meanwhile cut the chicken breast in half, remove the tendons, then slices and chop them. Add a little salt to the meats. Turn both sides into the flour and fry suddenly with alittle oil. Place the meat slices in a baking tray or fireproof bowl greased with a little oil.

At this point can start preheating the oven to  r, 250 ml milk, 5 tbs sour cream, salt, white pepper, 2-3 chips of star anise (or nutmeg powderas taste), 10 dkg cheese.

Preparation of the bechamel: In a pan, add flour over oil at low temperature. When mixed, before the flour starts to blush, pour the milk little by little, stirring constantly. Keep on the stove on low heat, place the 2-3 chips of star anise and stirring the bechamel constantly until thickened. Remove from the heat, allow to cool slightly and add the sour cream and mix well. Enrich it with grated cheese, and finally adjust the taste with salt and white pepper.

Now pour the bechamel onto the layered chicken breats and the cauliflower, and sprinkle 10-15 dkg grated cheese on top. Bake in the oven at 180 C degree for cca 20-25 mins. When the Dubarry chicken breast is baked it can be served with rice or mashed potatoes.

© Aggie Reiter

#10 Taste of Traditional Homemade Sweeties – Sour Cherry Pie – Meggyes Pite

After a heavy day in baking the Beigli here is an easy  cake to bake … namely the Sour Cherry Pie – Meggyes Pite

In the Northern Hemisphere the season of bloosoming cherry trees fell to rest, lucky those living in the Southern Hemisphere, cause they may bake with fresh cherries. We love them because they’re tasty, not to mention they have some awesome health benefits, too! Weather is off-season, you can use frozen unsweetened tart cherries, they will just take longer to cook down or the canned  sour or sweet cherries.

Just a hint, the sour cherry is also called tart cherry or wild cherry or even morellos  known closely related to the sweeet cherry, flesh of the fruit being softer and more acidic, therefore it is better for cooking and for pastry.

Fresh cherries are available for only a few months a year, but then get out of your deep freezer. Getting tired of these long cold grey and dirty days of long, drawn out Winter-Spring. Just pick the frozen, pitted, gorgeous sour cherries or sweet cherries or get the canned form of cherries. Time for a cherry pie bake something colourful, light and tasty.

No need to invent the Sour Cherry Pie – Meggyes Pite, cause this is a great recipe to give it a try and simple as 1-2-3.

A pie itself is an ultimate dessert. It is simple and tasty shortcrust pastry with any sweet seasonal filling. If in use other  fillings take the same amout of fruit as indicated below of apple weight.

Ingredients – preparing time cca 120  mins.

For the shortcrust: 500 g flour, 250 g butter, 125 g icing sugar, 24 g (2 packets) vanillia sugar, 10 g ( 1 packet) baking powder, 1 egg +1 egg york, 1-2 tbs sour cream, pinch of salt.

For the filling: 1 kg pitted sour cherry (if fresh is available) or the same amount of frozen or canned. 200 g icing sugar,60 g  breadcrumbs or grated walnuts, 1 egg york for coloring the top, icing sugar to serve (it looks good and taste good with it).

Baking process: Cruble the butter with the flour and the baking powder, add the icing sugar and  vanillia sugar. Add the eggs, the egg york, a pinch of salt and the sour cream. Knead the pasta quickly and  form 2 halves from it. Wrap it in foil and let it chill and rest for an hour in the fridge. Whikle the pastry rests, mix the sour cherry and the icing sugar. Line a baking pan with baking paper. Roll out the pastry into 2 sheets, fitting in the baking pan. Place one of the pastry sheets in the pan, sprinkle it with the breadcrumbs or walnut and spread the sour cherry on it … (if you use canned cherries then strain the juice beforehand).Place the2nd sheet on the top and form the sides. With a fork prick the surface. Brush the top with the egg york and bake it until it becomes slightly brown, it may take 50-60 mins. Leave it in the pan until it  chills before slicing the  pie.

Depending on taste, there are variations for the filling … poppy seed(grounded, caster sugar milk … cottage cheese sour cream, custer sugar) … apple (grated squeezed apples).

Depending on taste the width of pie … some like it with more filling, some like it with more pastry, it’s up to you. Enjoy the mouthwatering flavor in your tasting buds!

© by Aggie Reiter

 

#9 Taste of Traditional Homemade Sweeties – Beigli – Walnut/Poppy Pastry Roll

Beigli – Walnut/Poppy pastry roll
 
 
“Q” From where did the Beigli became a custom in Hungary and when? Beigli originates from Germany. Was in the 19th century during the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
“A” Beigli originates from Germany and in the 19th century during the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy became as indeed on one the real traditional Hungarian poastry.
 
Beigli is an authentic Hungarian pastry roll, also well known and popular in parts of Central – Eastern Europe and for sure in Israel.
This is a traditional food in Hungary which floats around at many kitchens at home and families have their own recipes. The beige is open to all fillings … with county-poppy, candied fruit, quince-nut, apple-cinnamon-cocoa, poppy-orange peel, plum jam, chestnuts, coconut, blueberry jam, dried peach nuts, rum-dried plums just to name a few.
The dough can either be risen dough … as here below … or crumbly dough. Some recipes call for cooking  the filling in milk,others simply direct to mix it with grated apple for added moisture. Beigli is a cake that keeps very well for days  or even for a couple of weeks.
 
Most pastry shops, patisseries and grocery stores sell Beigli, especially during the season at Xmas, but during any time of the season the begli is a treat having with a cuppa tea or coffee.
 
Before taking the road to bake the Beigli … it’s good to know … can give it a try to your hands, this is probably not a pastry for the beginning baker. If you have some experience baking things at home, though… you will be up for a challenge, but by the end certainly be rewarded for the awesome taste by family members.
 
Recipe: for 2 rolls … cca 8 servings … preparing time cca. 120-150 mins. (may sound longtime in baking a Beigli,  but time slips away so quickly as preparing and baking, not to mention enjoying the fantastic smell fulfilling the whole kitchen from the Beigli.
 
Ingredients:For the Dough:  330 g flour, 130 g butter, 30 g icing sugar, a pinch of salt, 50 ml milk, 1 egg york plus 1 egg separated, 20 g fresh yeast.
For the Filling: 150 g ground walnut or poppy seed, 4 tbs icing sugar, a handful of soaked raisins, 1 lemon zest, 200 ml milk.
 
Baking process: Place into the lukewarm milk the yeast and a tbs of sugar into a larger bowl and leave it for a few mins  till it is risen. Crumble the butter with the flour then add the salt, sugar, egg york and the milk with  the yeast. Mix it well and knead. If it goes too tough then mix it with  more warm milk into it. Let it rest for cca  half-an-hour. Then in the meantime can make the filling. Bring the ground walnut … or the ground poppy seeds … with milk, raisin, lemon zest and the sugar to a gentle boil, do not overheat, but it should not be too liquid.  Getting back to the dough now, divide the dough into 2 equal parts and start to roll out to a rectangle shape. Separate half of the filling to one dough, threnafter fill the other dough. Roll it up, start from the wider side. Seperate the eggs. Use a brush the surface with the egg york. After having it dried, then brush with the egg  white. Make a couple of holes on the top then place it into the oven of temp 180 C degree for cca 20-30 mins. The pastry will get a shinning brown color that will also open the door for the appetite. It has to be cooled down before slicing.
Bet your cake became delicious … enjoy every piece of it.
 
© by Aggie Reiter
 
 
Mentes a vírusoktól. www.avast.com

#8 Taste of Traditional Homemade Sweeties – Hungarian Krémes = Creamy

Traditional Hungarian Krémes = Creamy (a.k.a. Vanilla Slice )

The traditional krémes recipe is dating back to the end of the 16th century. The initial recipe did not resemble the known Krémes recipe. Since the 1930s the recipe did not change much but the form we know now-a-days developed in the 19th century. The history of the kémes goes back and appeared in 1840 in a cookbook published  by István Czifra suggested making the custard with cream, flour, egg yolk, vanilla, sugar, and butter, and placing it between two layers of dough.

In Hungary the krémes are so popular cake that it can be found in every Hungarian confectionery.

The Hungarian version of the famous cremeschnitte goes under the name Krémes, meaning Creamy. It combines two layers of puff pastry held together with a generous amount of smooth pastry cream. Though the recipe has been slightly modernized, the classic krémes pastry cream should be light and airy, while the top is usually dusted with powdered sugar. Traditionally served cut into large, rectangular slices, the dessert is a Hungarian classic and a staple at numerous pastry shops throughout the country.

Hungarian vanilla custard, layered between crisp, flaky slices of pastry, finished off with a generous sprinkling of powdered sugar make up this delicious sweet treat, which is a favorite dessert across the country. Many folks buy it at confectionery for after  Sunday’s lunch not to fiddle with cooking lunch and then to bake rétes. It is siply perfect  with a hot cup of coffee and is one of the most delicious, to mention as popular, Hungarian cakes.

Recipe: Ingredients: Vanilla infused milk:2 cups milk, 1 vanilla pod

Flaky pastry: 1-1/2 cup + 1 tbs flour, 3/4 cup chilled hard margarine, 1 pinch of salt, 4 Tbs cold water, 4 tsp vinegar.
Custard layer: 8 egg yolks, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/3 cup + 1tbs flour, 2 pkg. or 2 tsp real vanilla sugar, 3 pkg. gelatine (21 g), 1/4 cup unsalted butter, 8 egg whites, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 tsp fresh lemon juice, thermometer is essential. For the topping: 1/4 cup icing sugar.

Baking: Make the vanilla infused milk first. Heat the milk in a saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the milk with a paring knife, and add the bean pod to the milk. Cover, remove from heat, and infuse for one hour. Next make the flaky pastry. In a large bowl crumble the flour and the chilled margarine to fine crumbs.Mix in the salt. Place the cold water and the vinegar in a small dish. Pour the liquid over the pastry crumbs. Stir to combine and gradually form a rough ball. Generously flour a board and roll out the pastry into a thin rectangle. Roll up the pastry and divide into 4 parts. Roll each division into a thin rectangle. Stack the four rectangles on top of one another. Chill for twenty minutes. Divide the chilled pastry into two equal halves. Roll out the first pastry very thin. Fold it in half and place the folded edge in the middle of the 9X13 baking pan. Unfold and arrange the pastry with deep folds as in the photo. Let the dough go up the sides halfway, pastry will shrink during baking. Place in a preheated 400F oven for 14-18 minutes. Keep a watch, pastry burns easily. When the pastry is golden brown, remove pan from the oven. Immediately cut pastry into twelve squares. Divide the long side by 4 and the short side by 3. Wait a few minutes and very carefully remove the squares and set them aside in the same order as they were in the pan. These will go on the top later. Roll out the remaining dough and arrange it in the baking pan as before. Bake the second pastry sheet and set it aside. This will be the bottom of the krémes. Next make the custard layer. In a medium sized bowl beat the egg yolks and 1/2 cup sugar for 8 minute. In a separate bowl whisk together the flour, gelatine and the vanilla sugar. Gradually add the flour mixture to the beaten egg yolks and beat until smooth. Remove the vanilla pods from the vanilla infused milk. Gradually add the vanilla infused milk to the bowl with the eggs and the flour. Transfer custard to a medium sized pot. Attach the candy thermometer to the side of the pot so you can keep an eye on the temperature. Over medium heat and continually stirring heat the custard. Do not let custard heat beyond 80 C degree – 176 F for this recipe. When the custard reached 80C degree remove from heat. Stir in the butter and set aside. While the custard is cooling whip the egg whites. With clean beaters beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Add the lemon juice and beat until almost stiff. Add 1/2 cup sugar and beat until very stiff and shiny. Very slowly and gradually, gently fold the custard into the stiff egg whites. Pour on top of the bottom pastry layer and place in the fridge. Make sure the pan is level on the shelf. When the gelatine is beginning to set, place the pastry squares on the top. Let the krémes chill thoroughly. Before serving generously sift icing sugar on the top. Cut the slices between the pastry squares.

Good to Know: The mouthwatering Krémes – Creamy conquered Europe.  Dr. Oetker published similar recipes in 1935, where the cream was made with vanilla pudding instead of flour: Creampie or Cream Slice. Pudding became very popular in use, however, the original Krémes recipe is made with flour.

The krémes is also quite popular in other Central European countries. In Poland they are known as kremówkas, Slovakia call them krémeš, in Slovenia they go under the name of kremne rezine, Croatians use the name kremšnite, while Bosnians, Serbs, and Romanians have a term krempite.

© by Aggie Reiter

#6 Taste of Traditional Homemade Sweeties – Hungarian Jewish Flódni Cake

The Flódni is a traditional Jewish cake and was/is indeed the popular Chanuka cake which could not be missing orginally of Eastern-European Jewish families.

Now-a-days you can only taste it in Hungary, mainly @ Budapest’s well known confectionery.

In Hungary the Jewish community preserved the Flódni tradition. Indeed became very popular to the wider audience in Hungary and beside the Jewish community has come to symbolize the diversity of Hungarian society.

The cake has five layers of dough and four distinct fillings from down up to the top: poppy seed, apple, walnut, plum jam. The cake is reminiscent of old-world richness. It is time consuming … prepared at home, need cca 2 hours free time being in the kitchen, but will see was worthwhile to serve this superb mouthwatering yummy cake  any time of the day.

To be served for 4 persons – Preparing time: one-and-a- half – 2 hours.

Ingredients:  For the Dough: 8 tbs butter, sliced into 16 pieces and room temperature, 4 cups all-purpose flour, ½ tsp salt, ⅛ tsp baking powder,5 large yolks, ¾–1 cup white wine. For the Plum Filling: 2½ cups plum jam (in Hungarian: szilva lekvár) or apricot can be also as filling. For the Poppy Seed Filling: 2 cups poppy seed, ground in a coffee grinder, 4 tbs orange marmalade or apricot jam (add 2 tsp orange zest if using apricot jam), ¾ cup red wine, Pinch of ground cloves, ½ cup sugar. For the Walnut Filling: 8 ounces walnut pieces, finely chopped, ½ cup sugar, ½ cup red wine, ½ tsp cinnamon, 1 tbs orange marmalade or 1 tsp orange zest, 1 tbs cocoa powder. For the Apple Filling: 8 small apples, cored, peeled and grated (you can use a food processor to grate) (about 4 cups, packed), 1/3 cup orange marmalade, 1½ tsp cinnamon, ⅛ tsp ground cloves (optional), ¾ tsp vanilla extract, 2 tbs sugar, Pinch of salt. To Assemble: 2 tbs butter, melted, 1 egg beaten.

Preparation: The ingredients of the dough, with the exception of water, are combined with a robot. Add the water little by little and knead. Divide into 5 equal parts, stretch to a baking sheet size, and place everything on baking paper, then pack on top of each other and place in the refrigerator overnight.

To cook poppy seed  heat the ingredients on the stove for about 2-3 mins, until you notice bubbles. This mixture also has to go into the fridge for a night. To cook apple: Steam the apples in a medium saucepan together with the honey, the sugar, the white wine, the cloves and the cinnamon. Combine all ingredients and mix well. Cook, stirring, about 12 mins, until soft and the liquid has evaporated. It is important not to overcook it. To cook walnut: Place in a small pot, combine all ingredients and cook over medium heat, stirring, for about 5 mins, until thickened and liquid has evaporated. Set aside to cool.

Each filling must be cooled down before laying the dough. Place the first baking sheet lined with parchment paper, smear with the poppy seed, put on the next sheet apple filling, on the third dough base wallnut filling and then another dough and smear a little finger thick with plum jam, finally cover with the last dough base. After last piece of pastry, brush it with the mixture of egg yolk and milk and place it in the fridge for about 10 mins.

Preheat the oven to 200C degree and cook the cake for 10 mins, then reduce the heat to 175 C degree and cook for another extra 50 mins. Leave the cake for at least an hour outside of the oven.  Allow the Flódi to cool overnight.

If you want a really special delicacy, you have to try this baking … Be a Flódni Fairy … worth it!

© by Aggie Reiter