Archive for the ‘sporty’ Category

The Queen of Gymnastics Agnes Keleti turned 100 years on Saturday, January, 9.

Agnes Keleti was a headline celebrated to her 100th birthday on Saturday, January, 9, in the media not just in her native Budapest Hungary but around the world. She is the oldest living Olympic champion. Was a Holocaust survivor and winner of 10 Olympic medals in gymnastics … including five golds.

Keleti went through very hard and exciting chapters of her life … achievements, adventures, tragedies and perseverances, as she said, passed away in a flash of lightning. Also added Q.: “These 100 years felt to me like 60 yrs.”. When asked her what is the receipt to a long Life she answered Q.” Never look into the mirrow”. As always she also has kept her great sence of humor.

Agnes Keleti, was born Agnes Klein in 1921, had her illustrious career interrupted by World War II and the subsequent cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Olympics. Forced off her gymnastics goup in 1941 because of her Jewish ancestry, Keleti went into hiding in the Hungarian countryside where she survived the Holocaust by assuming a false identity and working as a maid. Her mother and sister survived the war with the help of famed Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, but her father and other relatives perished at Auschwitz, among the more than half a million Hungarian Jews killed in Nazi death camps and by Hungarian Nazi collaborators.

Resuming her career after the war, Keleti said her main goal was to travel around the world in the first place cause she always loved travel to different countries cause in those days was not an easy thing to have a passport, to leave Hungary and then came Q.” “I loved gymnastics because it was possible to travel for free.”

Also said during the interview how much adors traveling saying, the experiences gained while traveling the world were more precious than her 10 Olympic medals. Still today she would travel-and-travel but the pandemic rules the world but still hope when it will leave she will take off to explore additional landscapes.

In 1948 was set to compete at the 1948 London Olympics but a last-minute ankle injury dashed her hopes. Four years later, she made her Olympic debut at the 1952 Helsinki Games at the age of 31, winning a gold medal in the floor exercise as well as a silver and two bronzes.

Despite her achievements — with six medals she was the most successful athlete at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics and she is recognized as one of the most successful Jewish Olympic athletes of all time — the still-vivacious Keleti said she most values her health and the simple fact that she has lived. On the eve of her birthday Q.: “I live well, and it’s great that I’m still healthy, And I love life, Health is the essence. Without it, there is nothing.”

Those travels would ultimately result in a nearly 60-year absence from her native Hungary. At the age of 35, while she was becoming the oldest gold medalist in gymnastics history in Melbourne, the Soviet Union invaded Hungary following an unsuccessful anti-Soviet uprising.

Keleti remained in Australia and sought political asylum. She then immigrated to Israel the following year and worked as a trainer and coached the Israeli Olympic gymnastics team until the 1990s.

After leaving Hungary for the Olympics in 1956, she visited her native country only once before returning to Budapest in 2015.

Keleti was awarded the Israel Prize in 2017 — considered that country’s highest cultural honor — and is the recipient of numerous other prestigious awards, including being named one of Hungary’s “Athletes of the Nation” in 2004. She holds individual gold medals in the floor exercise, balance beam and uneven bars.

Starting this year, Israel’s championship for artistic gymnastics for women will bear the name of appraised Jewish Olympic gymnast Ágnes Keleti in honor of her upcoming 100th birthday celebrated on January 9. Agnes Keleti remains the most successful Jewish female athlete ever in Olympic history.

As said in the media, today, Keleti follows her doctor’s recent advice to avoid performing full leg splits, and her near-perpetual smile and infectious laughter are reminders that even in times of great hardship, there remains the immutable potential for perseverance and the joy of life.

© Aggie Reiter