Posts Tagged ‘Bratislava’

The XIV. MittelCinemaFest – 2016

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MittelCinemaFest – 2016

XIV. Italian Central European Film Festival

The cinema days are here again in Budapest

November, 5 -15. 2016.

The Mittel Cinema Fest is the largest promotion event for Italian cinema in Central Europe. The festival, promoted by Istituto Luce Cinecittà in collaboration with the Italian Cultural Institutes with the support of the Pushkin cinema (District,  V.,  18.  Kossuth Lajos  Street – Budapest) .

During the 10 days, the movie lovers will have the chance to watch the most significant films. Just as in the recent years  many Italian films will be screening at Budapest’s Pushkin cinema and also in co-operation at the Taban Cinema, as well as Cinenuovo, Cirko in the frame of Film Distributors  – Budapest Film Ltd.  The Mittel Cinema Fest has also made itself a landmark  as the most important festivals in Central Europe. Each year  the Pushkin cinema as the organiser and supporter of the event plays a major role in bringing the Italian films to  the Budapest’s audience.

This year eleven Italian films were selected  to be introduced from the selection of  productions from 2015 and 2016.

The MittelCinemaFest  each year keeps its tradition as the 1477314351995“traveling film festival”, so after the screenings ends  in Budapest, the movies head to the audience at Krakow, Bratislava and Prague.

To get into depth of the movies see the selection of films and the whereabouts to be screened on the Pushkin Cinema homepage.

Update Aggie Reiter

Exhibition Budapest – “Freedom Express” – European Network Remembrance and Solidarity.

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“Freedom Express”

Opening exhibition in Budapest until August, 8. 2015. 

Covering Roads to 1989. East-Central Europe 1939-1989 and is available for visitors at the open-air  park venue outside the National Museum .

Freedom Express is a social and educational campaign organised by the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity. Its first part was a study trip whereby a group of young artists, journalists and historians visited Solidarity’s Gdańsk, then Warsaw, Budapest, Sopron, Timisoara, Prague Bratislava and Berlin. The trip’s agenda of meetings, workshops and artistic activities was made possible thanks to the cooperation of a number of institutions involved with 20th century history.

The exhibition “Freedom Express was officially opened by Zoltán Balog, Hungarian Minister of Human Resources, along with dr László Csorba, director of the Hungarian National Museum, dr Iván Bába, the Hungarian coordinator of the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity, Lieselore Cyrus, Ambassador of the German Federal Republic to Hungary and Roman Kowalski, Ambassador of the Republic of Poland to Hungary. Over 100 honourable guests were present at the ceremony.

During the opening ceremony Minister Zoltán Balog said that the duty of those who survived the dictatorship is to keep the memory of the difficult past and pass it on to next generations. This is our moral obligation. He also stressed that the communication about the past only makes sense when something good comes as a result of it. That is why Minister Balog concluded with a question about the role of remembrance, which is the key issue in the work of the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity. The fundamental objective of the Freedom Express campaign, initiated by the ENRS, is to create a common narrative of European history – said Roman Kowalski, Ambassador of Poland in Hungary. He added that such projects contribute to shaping the dialogue and creating the complementary narration about the history of the 20th century, in which there is room for a multiplicity of perspectives and interpretations. This dialogue supports our identity, giving the chance to future generations to avoid the mistakes of the past – Ambassador Kowalski concluded. Dr Iván Bába stressed that today’s perception of the communist past only through the prism of humour and everyday life, can be misleading. During the communist past, the sense of humour played a crucial role and had a clearly defined therapeutic effect. With the help of Polish posters, Hungarian films and various other forms of artistic expression we tried to remain independent and defend ourselves. Today communist period returns in a specific pop version. It is becoming more and more popular amongst young people and unfortunately promotes a distorted picture of the past – explained dr Bába.

Ambassador of the German Federal Republic in Hungary, Lieselore Cyrus, observed that this exhibition is a signpost for the future, teaches us how to search for freedom. The idea of ​​freedom and democracy must remain our compass – she stated.

The exhibition, designed by historians associated with European Network Remembrance and Solidarity, documents the complicated process through which this part of Europe regained its freedom from communist dictatorship. Presented earlier in Berlin, Brussels, and Warsaw the exhibition concentrates on various ways in which civil liberties were limited in the former communist bloc and on attempts made to regain them. It focuses especially on the question of what connects and divides remembrance of the events that preceded the fall of communism in Central and Eastern.

For those who wish to go back in time to refresh a little history here is the site  to learn more: http://1989.enrs.eu/exhibition

Update and snaps by Aggie Reiter